Sunday June 16, 2019
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When completed, it will be a major investment providing more housing units for students near the University of Louisville. On Thursday, ground was broken on the Marshall of Louisville located at 2400 South Fourth Street.

“The Marshall will be a great addition to District 6 and when completed will enhance this area as we continue the revitalization of South Fourth Street,” said President David James, who joined Mayor Greg Fischer for the ground breaking.

The Marshall Louisville is an approximately $50 million investment in President James’ District. The project will have 231 Units that sit atop a 232 space parking garage.   The development team worked with us to make the garage disappear as you will not even notice it.  531 University of Louisville Students will occupy this site in a short period of time.

“We are excited to support the University of Louisville and to provide student housing as the University delivers on its plan for growth,” Jack Dulworth, the local partner of Aptitude 4th Street, LLC remarked.

“The Marshall is the first of many projects that will transform University Corridor and give residents and visitors a feeling of place near the university and Churchill Downs,” says Councilwoman Marianne Butler (D-15).  “I applaud Jack Dulworth and his partners on making this bold investment and look forward to other developments along the corridor.”

It is a new 10-story luxury student living complex sitting on a 1.5 acre lot being developed by Dulworth and Aptitude 4th Street, LLC.

The property will house 591 beds throughout 231 fully furnished units. The complex will include two parking garage floors beneath eight stories of residential apartments and amenities. The penthouse floor will feature a 2,500 square-foot outdoor terrace and 8,000 square feet of amenity space, including a gym, study lounges and game rooms for students to relax with unobstructed views of the iconic Churchill Downs.

This is the first time in recent large student housing developments that there is a local partner, Jack Dulworth, who has had a substantial role in the development to date.

“I am glad to see this day come,” said James. “The City worked hard to land the project as this area that has been a high priority target for redevelopment.”

As the project moves forward, President James is committed to making substantial improvements to the underpass entrance to the University of Louisville to make it friendlier for people walking, biking or “Birding”, which refers to scooters that have recently become part of Metro Louisville’s transportation mode.

To learn more about the project, go to: https://www.aptitudere.com/the-marshall-louisville/

William Marvin Petty, M.D., Research Fund will support next step for promising research to improve pancreatic islet cell transplantation success

JoAnn Joule’s father, William Marvin Petty, M.D., suffered from diabetes for many years. A 1952 graduate of the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Petty served as Jefferson County Coroner from 1962 to 1974 and was a family physician in Fern Creek for 43 years.

Joule’s son lives with type 1 diabetes.

To honor her late father and help improve the lives of those with type 1 diabetes, Joule has given $500,000 to the University of Louisville Foundation to establish the William Marvin Petty, M.D., Research Fund. The fund is designated to support type 1 diabetes research at the UofL School of Medicine.

“I saw the toll diabetes took on my dad, and now my son is faced with the same disease,” Joule said. “I was not happy that medical research has not come up with anything new in the 40 years my son has been suffering. I am putting my assets behind the UofL research team.”

That research team includes Haval Shirwan, Ph.D., and Esma Yolcu, Ph.D., of the UofL Department of Microbiology and Immunology, who are working to develop techniques to prevent and treat type 1 diabetes with particular focus on transplantation of islet cells.

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the pancreas does not produces enough insulin, a hormone required to convert glucose to energy in the body. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes, and standard treatment involves regular injections of insulin, which is far from keeping blood sugar in balance.

Insulin is produced in the pancreas by a type of cells called islet cells. Individuals with type 1 diabetes have too few or altogether lack the type of islet cells that produce insulin to keep glucose at the proper level. In recent years, physicians have developed a treatment in which they transplant the needed islet cells into a patient. However, the patient’s immune system often rejects the transplanted islet cells over time, attacking and killing them. To keep the transplanted cells alive, patients must take immunosuppression medications, which have a number of undesirable side effects.   Continue reading

Two scholars who research Native American culture, music and literature will share their sounds and insights in free, public talks this fall at the University of Louisville.

Both speakers are Anishinaabe, indigenous people of the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada.

The Commonwealth Center for the Humanities and Society is offering the lectures in partnership with other units of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Here are details:

Sept. 13 – “Anishinaabe Translations of Global Literature,” with poet Margaret Noodin, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee associate professor of English and director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. Noodin will talk about the way indigenous languages contribute to the way people understand literature; her current project is translating works of authors including Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare into her native language. The 4-6 p.m. event in Room 100, Bingham Humanities Building, is co-hosted by the humanities doctoral program.

Oct. 11 — “Indigenous North America – Hip-hop and Modernity,” with Kyle Mays, University of California-Los Angeles assistant professor of African American studies and author of a book about the topic. Mays will draw from his black and Saginaw Anishinaabe heritage in exploring the cultural and political significance of Native American and indigenous hip-hop artists’ work in challenging colonialism. The 4-6 p.m. event in Room 300, Bingham Humanities Building, is co-hosted by the history, English, Pan-African studies and comparative humanities departments.

For more information, contact Brandon Harwood at 502-852-7140 or Brandon.harwood@louisville.edu.

Mayor Greg Fischer proclaimed that Friday will be Wear Red Day in Louisville to support the Louisville Cardinals women’s basketball team in the Final Four.

The Mayor is asking citizens across the community to wear Cardinal red on Friday, when the team takes on Mississippi State for a spot in the women’s NCAA Tournament championship game. If UofL wins, the Mayor asks that citizens again wear Cardinal red on Sunday to support the team as they play for the national championship.

“What the Cardinals have achieved this season is absolutely extraordinary — an ACC Championship, No. 1 seed in the Big Dance, a first team All-American in Asia Durr, and now a spot in the Final Four,” Mayor Fischer said. “Let’s show UofL women’s basketball that we stand with them and are ready to cheer like crazy this weekend.”

The Cardinals play Mississippi State at 7 p.m. Friday. The winner faces Notre Dame or Connecticut for the National Championship on Sunday.

Mayor Greg Fischer today proclaimed that Friday will be Wear Red Day in Louisville to support the Louisville Cardinals women’s basketball team in the Final Four.

The Mayor is asking citizens across the community to wear Cardinal red on Friday, when the team takes on Mississippi State for a spot in the women’s NCAA Tournament championship game. If UofL wins, the Mayor asks that citizens again wear Cardinal red on Sunday to support the team as they play for the national championship.

“What the Cardinals have achieved this season is absolutely extraordinary — an ACC Championship, No. 1 seed in the Big Dance, a first team All-American in Asia Durr, and now a spot in the Final Four,” Mayor Fischer said. “Let’s show UofL women’s basketball that we stand with them and are ready to cheer like crazy this weekend.”

The Cardinals play Mississippi State at 7 p.m. Friday. The winner faces Notre Dame or Connecticut for the National Championship on Sunday.

On the eve of an important ACC football showdown between the University of Louisville and Clemson University, Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville and Mayor J.C. Cook III of Clemson are putting a friendly wager on the line: Bourbon.

Mayor Fischer is putting up a collection of small bottles from Louisville distilleries — Angel’s Envy, Old Forester, Evan Williams, Mitchter’s, Kentucky Peerless, Bulleit Bourbon, Rabbit Hole and Jim Beam — while Clemson’s wager is a bottle of Six & Twenty, from a South Carolina artisan distillery owned by two Clemson grads.

Its five-grain bourbon is made with all South Carolina grown grains, Mayor Cook said. “As mayor of Clemson, I am proud to say both our football team and our South Carolina bourbon will bring their A-game to the table,” he said.

Though Clemson has won all three games played since U of L joined the ACC, Mayor Fischer is extremely confident about his team’s chances.

“I look forward to trying a sip of my Six & Twenty winning after the Cards win, although I still have my doubts about any bourbon that’s not made in Kentucky,” he said. “I may just save it to celebrate when our quarterback, Lamar Jackson, wins his second Heisman.”

Mayor Cook said he’s looking forward to the game, which has drawn ESPN’s “College GameDay” back to Louisville for the second consecutive season.

Louisville vs. Clemson “has become one of the most exciting rivalries in football, and it’s so great to see how the Louisville fans welcome us with such hospitality,” he said. “We may have to start naming this the Friendly Bowl.”

Gov. Matt Bevin made the following appointments to Kentucky’s public university boards:

Dr. Sandra Robbin Shuffett and Derrick Ramsey have been appointed to the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees.

  • Dr. Sandra Robbin Shuffett, of Nicholasville, is a physician for Baptist Health a part-time farmer. Shuffett is a former graduate program instructor and has been a frequent lecturer on the subject of breast cancer, mammography and radiology. She will represent agricultural interests and serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.
  • Derrick Ramsey, of Lexington, is Secretary of the Kentucky Labor Cabinet and a former NFL player with the 1981 Super Bowl champion Oakland Raiders. Ramsey is a former University of Kentucky quarterback, where he helped to lead the Wildcats to the 1976 SEC Championship and the 1976 Peach Bowl. He will serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.

Roger Reynolds has been appointed to the Kentucky State University Board of Regents.

  • Roger Reynolds, of Louisville, is an entrepreneur and small business owner. Reynolds serves on the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis – Louisville Branch Board and is a former KSU trustee. He will serve for the remainder of an unexpired term ending June 30, 2018.

Deborah Haydon Long has been appointed to the Morehead State University Board of Regents.

  • Deborah Haydon Long, of Lexington, is proprietor of Dudley’s on Short restaurant and a current MSU trustee. Long is a member of the Central Bank Advisory Board, and her business was recognized by Southern Living magazine as “Best Restaurant in Kentucky” for 2017. She has been reappointed to the board and will serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.

Don Irvin Tharpe has been appointed to the Murray State University Board of Regents.

  • Don Irvin Tharpe, of Nicholasville, is a past president of the Pan American Health and Education Foundation and former executive director of the Association of School Business Officials International. Tharpe is a “Distinguished Alumnus” of MSU, where he earned multiple degrees in industrial education. He will serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.

George Nichols III has been appointed to the Western Kentucky University Board of Regents.

  • George Nichols III, of Potomac, Maryland, is executive vice president of governmental affairs for New York Life Insurance Company and a former Kentucky Commissioner of Insurance. Nichols currently serves on the Alice Lloyd College Board of Trustees and was a past chairman of the National Organization of Life and Health Guaranty Associations. He will serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.

Juan Carlos Castro and Christopher Pace have been appointed to the Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents.

  • Juan Carlos Castro, of Lexington, is managing partner of JCC Accounting Solutions and chairman of the Lexington Hispanic Education Association. Castro is currently an instructor with the Latino Tax Preparers Association and board member of Matthew 5:16 Ministries International. He will serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.
  • Christopher Pace, of Winchester, is an investor and attorney. Pace was a former student trustee on the EKU Board of Regents and the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education. He will serve for the remainder of an unexpired term ending June 30, 2021.

Ashley Himes has been appointed to the Northern Kentucky University Board of Regents.

  • Ashley Himes, of California, is assistant principal for Northern Elementary School in Pendleton County and a part-time farmer. Himes and her husband hold multiple degrees from NKU and are involved with various education and community-related organizations. She will serve for a term expiring June 30, 2023.

Raymond Burse has been appointed to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees.

  • Raymond Burse, of Prospect, is a retired vice president and general counsel for GE Appliances and a former president of Kentucky State University. Burse has served on the boards of many non-profit and professional organizations, including the Center for Creative Leadership. He will serve for the remainder of an unexpired term ending January 13, 2019.

Kentucky public university boards are composed of eight members appointed by the governor and three other members—including a teaching faculty representative, a nonteaching employee representative and the student body president.

Karen Finan has been appointed to the Kentucky Community and Technical College System Board of Regents.

  • Karen Finan, of Ft. Mitchell, is a partner at Gilman Partners and former senior vice president of Northern Kentucky Tri-County Economic Development Corporation. Finan also serves as chairwoman of Aviatra Accelerators and the Northern Kentucky Education Council. She will serve for a term expiring July 21, 2023.

The Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) Board of Regents is composed of eight members appointed by the governor and six other members—including two members each of the teaching faculty, non-teacher personnel and student body, representing respective KCTCS institutions.

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