Sunday December 9, 2018
News Sections

Tonight, rodeo fans converge on Freedom Hall for the final night of the North American Championship Rodeo. The top ropers and riders in the Great Lakes Circuit Rodeo will be competing for a chance to be named the Regional Champion in each event and a spot in the Nationals Circuit Finals in Kissimmee, FL next spring.

The rodeo kicked off Thursday night with the participants competing over three grueling nights of rodeo action in seven events. Tonight is the final night for the participants to improve their average to be named the Regional Champion and take home their share of the purse. Attendees can watch cowboys ride broncos and bulls, wrestle steer and rope steer and calves, while cowgirls race around the arena for the fastest time in the barrel racing event. Attendees will also be treated to the guest appearance of a couple of beautiful and iconic American animals during John “The One-Armed Bandit” Payne’s 15-time PRCA Rodeo Act of the Year.

The rodeo bucks out of the chute at 7:30 PM and tickets are available, starting at $10. With tonight being the final competition, it will be packed house. Admission does not include parking at the Kentucky Exposition Center, which is $10 per vehicle.

The rodeo occurs in conjunction with the North American International Livestock Expo. The Expo started October 31 and will continue until November 15. Livestock being featured today are sheep and beef cattle. The marketplace will be open extended hours tonight to allow attendees to shop before the rodeo begins.   Continue reading

The North American International Livestock Expo (NAILE) still has nearly a week of agricultural showmanship left, but tonight marks the last night for the associated 2017 Great Lakes Circuit Finals of the Pro Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

From barrel racing and roping to the rough stock events of bronco and bull riding, the North American Championship Rodeo brings fast paced action to freedom hall as dozens of cowboys and cowgirls compete for a purse of tens of thousands of dollars in prize money.  The action kicks off at 7:30 PM in Freedom Hall.

The first two nights of go ’rounds are wrapped up and now the competitors seek to lock in the glory and prizes of finishing at the top of the list among the seven main events, which include bareback bronco riding, team roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, tie down roping, barrel racing, and the thrilling crowd pleaser – bull riding.

The event isn’t just roping and riding either.  Throughout the competition, the crowd is entertained with numerous acts such as the “The Most Recognized Cowboy in the World,” Whiplash the Cowboy Monkey, the illuminating equestrian riding show from the Red Rock Riders Drill Team, and the comedy routines of the PRCA rodeo clown.

Tonight’s event also features two special promotions.  To mark Veterans Day, in honor of those who have served our country, active military members, veterans and first responders will receive 50% off of their admission.  Tonight is also Kid’s Cowboy Hat Night – the first 500 children in the lobby of Freedom Hall after 6PM will receive a free straw cowboy hat.

You won’t want to miss this action packed evening at Freedom Hall!

Visit us on Facebook to see more photos of the action.

 

The North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) is the largest all-breed, purebred livestock expo in the world, with 30,000 cattle, goats, swine, llamas and alpacas, sheep and horses competing for nearly $750,000 in premiums and awards. The show runs Oct. 31-Nov. 16 throughout the Kentucky Exposition Center.

Barrel Racing Riders race against the clock in this fast-paced competition where agility and speed are key. Youth competition begins Wednesday, Nov. 1 at 10 a.m. in Broadbent Arena and continues Tuesday, Nov. 7 at 9 a.m. with amateur, girls and open barrel racing. Juniors and seniors compete Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 9 a.m.

Cowboy Mounted Shooting Cowboys take aim at ten targets in this timed event, shooting for both accuracy and speed. The winning rider is determined by compiling the most hits, fewest penalties and quickest time. This event is held in Freedom Hall: 

  • Thursday, Nov. 9 8 a.m.
  • Friday, Nov. 10 12 p.m.
  • Saturday, Nov. 11 8 a.m.

Draft Horse Shows Draft horses, known for their beauty and strength, compete by pulling weighted carts and wagons. Teams are judged on performance, driving and conformation. The shows are held in in Freedom Hall: 

  • Friday, Nov. 10 8 a.m.
  • Saturday, Nov. 11 8 a.m.

Entrance to competitions is included with NAILE admission: $6 for adults; and $3 for seniors (55 and older) and children (ages 2-12). Parking is $8 daily. Event passes for the entire expo are $25 for admission and $25 for parking.

Free admission and parking are available to visitors and North American Marketplace shoppers Nov. 7-8.

NAILE features the North American Marketplace, wool showcase, children’s barnyard and more. The separately ticketed North American Championship Rodeo is held Nov. 9-11 in Freedom Hall, in conjunction with the North American International Livestock Exposition.

For more information, visit www.livestockexpo.org.   Continue reading

National Ag Day is today, and it is a good time to reflect on some of the many ways agriculture affects us every day.

Agriculture is a major economic driver in Kentucky and the United States. Nationally, it is one of few sectors that can boast a trade surplus. In Kentucky, agricultural exports totaled an estimated $1.46 billion in 2015. A University of Kentucky report found that agriculture and related industries in Kentucky had an estimated economic impact of $45.6 billion and accounted for more than 258,000 jobs in 2013.

Agriculture, of course, feeds us all. We rely on farmers and food manufacturers to produce the abundant and affordable foods and beverages that we all depend on – and often take for granted. Thanks to the productivity and efficiency of U.S. agriculture, Americans spend an average of only 9.7 percent of their income on food – the lowest in the world.

Of course, that is not true of all Americans. The lowest 20 percent of the population based on earnings pay as much as 35 percent of their income to feed themselves and their families. Some have to make hard choices to make ends meet. This situation is intolerable, and that is why we launched the Kentucky Hunger Initiative and assembled the Hunger Task Force last year. You can help by checking the box on Line 33 of Form 740 to donate part of your state tax refund to the Kentucky Farms to Food Banks Trust Fund. Together, we can make a difference in the lives of Kentuckians in need.

If you want to learn more about Kentucky agriculture, follow the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s #KyAg365 campaign on Facebook and Twitter. We launched #KyAg365 at the beginning of the year to raise awareness of how agriculture affects every single person 365 days a year! This campaign educates the public on the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s initiatives as well as the importance of agriculture in the lives of all Kentuckians.

We thank everyone who has liked, shared, and retweeted our posts! Many organizations, businesses, and individuals have used the hashtag to mark their own Kentucky ag-related posts. We hope you will watch for more #KyAg365 posts and discover amazing facts about Kentucky agriculture.

On National Ag Day, I hope you will take a moment to consider how your food is produced and where it comes from. And as always, if you like to eat, thank a farmer!

Christian County flock depopulated; surveillance continues

Federal and state authorities say a case of low pathogenic avian influenza has been detected in a commercial poultry flock in western Kentucky.

Kentucky State Veterinarian Robert C. Stout said the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the presence of H7N9 low pathogenic avian influenza in samples taken from the Christian County premises.

The virus exposure at the premises was initially detected by the Murray State University Breathitt Veterinary Center in Hopkinsville while conducting a routine pre-slaughter test last week. Dr. Stout said there were no clinical signs of disease in the birds. The affected premises is under quarantine, and the flock of approximately 22,000 hens was depopulated as a precautionary measure, Dr. Stout said.

“Dr. Stout and his staff have extensive experience and expertise in animal disease control and eradication,” Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “They have an excellent working relationship with the Kentucky Poultry Federation and the poultry industry. They are uniquely qualified to contain this outbreak so our domestic customers and international trading partners can remain confident in Kentucky poultry.”

Low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) may cause no disease or mild illness. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) can cause severe disease with high mortality.

The OSV and its partners in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS) are conducting surveillance on flocks within a six-mile radius of the index farm, Dr. Stout said. The company that operates the farm is conducting additional surveillance testing on other commercial facilities it operates within that area.   Continue reading

LouisvilleDispatch_NFMS17_0567The National Farm Machinery Show continues to be one of the largest-attended events at the Kentucky Exposition Center — and is ranked 6th in attendance for the Top Ten Largest U.S. Trade Shows. Held Feb. 15-18 of this year, attendees, exhibitors and agribusiness professionals totaled more than 300,000.

The National Farm Machinery Show (NFMS) spanned 1.2 million square feet and was packed with 880 booths of the agricultural industry’s latest and most comprehensive display of equipment, services and technology. Other highlights included 15 free seminars with topics ranging from market strategies to aerial imagery to farm data.

As the nation’s largest indoor farm show, NFMS brings an economic impact of $17 million to Louisville annually, filling local hotels and restaurants with attendees from across the country and around the world.

An indicator of the show’s future potential, the National Farm Machinery Show and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) announced a verbal agreement. Beginning in 2018, AEM will assist with management and co-promotion of NFMS, and have an equity position in the future growth of the event.

The Championship Tractor Pull, held in conjunction with the farm show, sold more than 65,000 tickets.  Fans flooded Freedom Hall for five pulls, which drew the nation’s top drivers as they competed for the title of Grand Champion and more than $200,000 in prize money.

For more information, visit www.farmmachineryshow.org.

In support of Kentucky agriculture, Attorney General Andy Beshear  joined with other egg-producing states to ask the country’s highest court to review a lower court’s decision that upheld California’s “Shell Egg Laws.”

In 2015, the six states asked the Ninth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals to block enforcement of the California laws and regulations prescribing standards for the conditions under which chickens must be kept in order for producers to sell eggs in the state. California is the country’s largest egg market.

The appeals court ruled against the six states in favor of a lower court ruling. The group of states are now asking the United States Supreme Court to take up the issue. The states are Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma.

“Kentucky is a thriving egg-producing state, and this law places our agriculture industry and farming families at a disadvantage by increasing farming cost and driving up the cost of food for Kentuckians,” Beshear said. “The Supreme Court must review this issue in order to level the playing field for our producers against out-of-state regulations.”

KYFair15_4362The group of five attorneys general and the Governor of Iowa representing egg-producing states argue that the laws hurt agriculture in their states and are in violation of the Commerce Clause, which regulates trade among states and foreign nations.

The group asserts that its egg farmers must choose to either bring their entire operations into compliance or not sell in the California marketplace. The states argue that the necessary capital improvements to meet the standards would cost farmers hundreds of millions of dollars.

Kentucky farmers produced 1.3 billion eggs in 2015, according to the USDA.

Archives