Friday November 16, 2018
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Native American talks focus on hip-hop impact, global literature translation

Two scholars who research Native American culture, music and literature will share their sounds and insights in free, public talks this fall at the University of Louisville.

Both speakers are Anishinaabe, indigenous people of the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada.

The Commonwealth Center for the Humanities and Society is offering the lectures in partnership with other units of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Here are details:

Sept. 13 – “Anishinaabe Translations of Global Literature,” with poet Margaret Noodin, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee associate professor of English and director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. Noodin will talk about the way indigenous languages contribute to the way people understand literature; her current project is translating works of authors including Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare into her native language. The 4-6 p.m. event in Room 100, Bingham Humanities Building, is co-hosted by the humanities doctoral program.

Oct. 11 — “Indigenous North America – Hip-hop and Modernity,” with Kyle Mays, University of California-Los Angeles assistant professor of African American studies and author of a book about the topic. Mays will draw from his black and Saginaw Anishinaabe heritage in exploring the cultural and political significance of Native American and indigenous hip-hop artists’ work in challenging colonialism. The 4-6 p.m. event in Room 300, Bingham Humanities Building, is co-hosted by the history, English, Pan-African studies and comparative humanities departments.

For more information, contact Brandon Harwood at 502-852-7140 or Brandon.harwood@louisville.edu.

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