Wednesday October 18, 2017

News Topics

Joining with other cities and organizations across the country, Mayor Greg Fischer has proclaimed October 5 as Energy Efficiency Day to bring attention to the benefits of being energy efficient including utility bill cost savings, support of a thriving clean energy sector, reduction of emissions and improvement of air quality. Saving energy means saving money.

“Upgrades in energy efficiency in the workplace, the home or commercial business reduces energy bills and improves environmental health,” Fischer said. “The city continues to take steps to increase energy efficiency in its buildings so that less money is needed to operate our buildings and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. I encourage property owners across the city to consider implementing energy efficiency measures.”

Energy efficiency speaks directly to the Mayor’s sustainability goals to decrease energy use citywide per capita and in city-owned buildings.

Since 2013, the city has conducted significant energy efficiency improvements including lighting and HVAC upgrades, solar panels, and building management system controls, in more than 200 city operated buildings. In 2016, these energy efficiency improvements reduced an amount of carbon emissions equivalent to planting 45,963 trees and removing 3,034 cars from the road.

The city also partners with the Louisville Energy Alliance to promote ENERGY STAR certification for non-residential buildings and launched a cool roof rebate program that can reduce energy costs by up to 10% for the property owner.

Other cities that are joining in Energy Efficiency Day include Chicago, Denver, Memphis, New Orleans, Knoxville, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh.

If you want like to invest in energy saving methods in your home, workplace or commercial business, please contact the Office of Sustainability at 574-6285 or sustainability@louisvilleky.gov.

To view who else is joining in Energy Efficiency Day, visit https://energyefficiencyday.org/

Fans of all genres of rock, from 80’s-style glam-rock to speed metal, packed Lousville’s Champions Park, as they have since the Louder Than Life started in 2014.

Across the two day event, three dozen bands played three stages to a mass of tens of thousands of fist-pumping, crowd-surfing, mosh-pitting concert goers.  While main stage acts like Ozzy Osbourne, Rob Zombie, Five Finger Death Punch, Incubus, Stone Sour, and supergroup Prophets of Rage drew the largest crowd, the performers kept the excitement going from the opening show just after noon each day well into the night until the final curtain.

The opening-day first chords were struck on one of the two main stages by New Jersey hardcore act, Palisades and, shortly after, the other end of the 200+ acre venue on the Zorn Stage by He Is Legend.  The shows continued throughout Saturday with more acts including DED, Of Mice and Men, Steel Panther, Five Finger Death Punch, Mastodon, Rob Zombie, and Eagles of Death Metal (EODM) – who gained unfortunate notoriety when, in 2015, terrorists attacked the Bataclan Theater in Paris while the band was on stage.

On moving on, EODM bassist Matt McJunkins told a CNN reporter shortly after the attack, “music is what we do, it’s our lives, and there’s no way we’re not going to keep doing it.”  And “keep doing it” they did, as they rocked a packed Loudmouth Stage crowd during their set.

The show continued Saturday through Ozzy Osbourne’s closing act, during which apologized to the crowd several times as his voice cracked and went off-pitch.  Voice issues are nothing new for The Godfather of Heavy Metal; in a 2007 interview, the Prince of Darkness told the News TribuneI get a lot of voice problems. You have to do a lot of shouting, you know. […] I had a little bit of voice trouble. But it seems to be getting better now, you know.

Last year, Ozzy opened up to Kerrang! magazine that the one thing he fears is losing his voice, saying that, unlike a guitar player who could simply get another instrument, singers only get one voice.  During face-melting guitar solos by Zakk Wylde and an unbelievable, extended drum solo by Tommy Clufetos, Ozzy sipped tea, chewed gum and popped lozenges, eventually gaining back his voice and putting on a fantastic show.

Despite being a massive music festival, heavy tunes and head-banging is not all that the event offers, as indicated by the other two-thirds of Louder Than Life’s of Music, Whiskey, and Grub.

Stretched between the Monster and Loudmouth Stages at one end and Zorn Stage at the opposite end, Champions Park was lined with a variety of vendors, displays, and attractions – everything from purveyors of booze and greasy fried festival food to swag merchants and USMC recruiting opportunities.  Everything looked and smelled good, although our editors can personally vouch for Rock n Roll BBQ as the perfect fuel for hungry festival goers.

Often accompanying what can easily turn into an all-day drinking contest in the hot sun are rowdy types.  However, out of control ne’er-do-wells have been absent from the Louder Than Life events that we have witnessed.  LMPD officers are on hand to help reign in unruly behavior, but they appeared to be able to spend the vast majority of their time handling access control and taking in the music and people watching rather than dealing with rowdy types.

EMTs are also on hand; thankfully they mainly work to keep people hydrated and patch up minor scrapes rather than dealing with any real injuries – which might come as a surprise to outsiders watching what might otherwise appear as a violent scene inside a mosh pit.  A number of festival attendees were making their way around the event in wheelchairs, but – as best as we could tell – they arrived thusly equipped… several of them even participating in the crowd surfing, chair and all.  The mosh pits, though few and far between given the heavy nature of the on-stage performances, were fast paced yet respectful for participants, who came away mostly unscathed.

One exception was Nick, who, during Stone Sour’s Sunday set, caught an inadvertent elbow to his sunglasses and got a cut over his eye.  Though winded, Nick was in good spirits and both he and his friend described the situation as “pretty metal!

The high-energy show continued Sunday, kicked off by Black Map and Louder Than Life alums, ’68.  The day continued with acts including Falling in Reverse, Greta Van Fleet, and Palaye Royale.

Sunday also featured a powerful lineup of metal bands with female leads, including Lzzy Hale’s Halestorm, former Cindy Lou Who Taylor Momsen’s The Pretty Reckless, Cristina Scabbia with gothic staple Lacuna Coil, and In This Moment, featuring two-time “Rock Goddess of the Year” and Revolver’s “Hottest Chick in Metal,” Maria Brink.

If the atmosphere during the rest of the event could be described as electric, Sunday night’s main stage performances ratcheted things up to another level of high voltage.

Chicago’s hardcore Rise Against ignited the crowed with a high-speed set that incited an ocean of crowd surfers that only swelled more once lead singer Tim McIlrath descended from the stage to mount the stage barrier and greet fans lucky enough to surf his way as he belted out lyrics.

Sunday’s energy continued as Corey Taylor, returning after his 2017 Louder Than Life headline performance with Slipknot, led Stone Sour through blistering vocals and heavy drum and guitar backing while dousing the front rows of the moshing crowd with bottled water.

Calabasas-based perennial favorite Incubus calmed the crowd a bit during their set under cool blue lighting, Brandon Boyd’s melodic vocals, and mellower tunes.

The slowdown did not last long, however, as the weekend-long festival wrapped up on a high note with rap-rock supergroup, Prophets of Rage – comprised of Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave‘s Tom Morello, Tim Commerford, and Brad Wilk; Public Enemy‘s Chuck D and DJ Lord; and Cypress Hill‘s B-Real.

Pumping fists in the sky, the crowd – who likely sang as much of the songs as those on stage – took the performers’ lyrical advice to get out their seats and jump around to heart and stayed mobile throughout the show.

During their set, the band performed a somber Like a Stone tribute to fellow Audioslave member and former Soundgarden frontman, Chris Cornell – who died earlier this year in May – amidst a sea of cell phone lights and lighter flames before continuing their high-energy set through their final performance, Killing in the Name.

Rock and metal fans were treated to an outstanding weekend of Louder Than Life’s trademark music, bourbon, and “gourmet man food,” and left the venue, as always, excited for the next iteration of the festival.  Fans are, no doubt, anxiously awaiting new of what the five-year anniversary of the event holds in store.

Check out more photos from Louder Than Life 2017 below and on our Facebook gallery.

The Kentucky State Council for the Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3) met Sept. 29 to renew its mission of supporting military families who transition between school systems.

“When a member of our armed forces is transferred to Kentucky, I want them to find this state and its school systems waiting with open arms,” said Gov. Bevin. “As Kentuckians and Americans, we should find ways to intentionally express our gratitude to these brave men and women. I am thankful to see this commission at work in Kentucky, and look forward to seeing how it will help honor those who put their lives on the line to defend and secure our liberty.”

Military families move between postings on a regular basis. While reassignments are often beneficial to a service member’s career, they can also add stress to military families, especially children. Issues facing these children include: Losing and making new friends, adjusting to new cities and bases, fitting in with new extracurricular/sporting teams and changing schools. The armed services and Kentucky have made great efforts to ease the transition of personnel, spouses and children.

“Kentucky’s MIC3 council has set an example of excellence on multiple occasions with how well it responded to the needs of our military families, and I’m looking forward to the impact we will continue to make,” said Col. (Ret.) M. Blaine Hedges, commissioner for the Kentucky MIC3 council. “We have a solid group of professionals, including legislators, local officials, Department of Defense leadership and the Kentucky Department of Education, and we are working toward a shared vision.”

The average military student faces transition challenges more than twice during high school, and most military children will attend between six and nine different school systems in their lives from kindergarten to 12th grade. More than half of all military personnel have dependents, and the impacts of reassignment and long deployments are key considerations when making long-term life choices.

“One of the critical aspects of a state’s membership in MIC3 is its obligation to ensure they hold State Council meetings on a regular basis. This provides the opportunity to plan strategies, and provide a forum to share stories and best practices,” said Cherise Imai, National Executive Director of the MIC3. “It is a testament to Kentucky and the other states engaging their councils that shows the importance they all place on these meetings. We salute military members that sacrifice so much for this country but remain focused on those left behind, the military children.”

The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children was developed by the Council of State Governments’ National Center for Interstate Compacts, the U.S. Department of Defense, national associations, federal and state officials, state departments of education, school administrators and military families. The MIC3 is a governmental entity operating under the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children. All 50 states and the District of Columbia are members of the compact, which ensures the uniform treatment of military children transferring between states and public school districts.

For more information about the Kentucky council, visit https://education.ky.gov/educational/Pages/Support-Our-Military-Families-in-School-Transitions.aspx.

In accordance with the proclamation by United States President Donald Trump, and with respect for those who lost their lives in the Las Vegas massacre, Governor Matt Bevin has directed both American and state flags at all state office buildings be lowered to half-staff beginning immediately until sunset on Oct. 6 to honor the victims and their families.

“What happened in Las Vegas was the handiwork of unadulterated evil in its vilest, most despicable form,” said Gov. Bevin. “Kentucky stands in solidarity with the citizens of Las Vegas and with all Americans in defiance of any act of terrorism against the citizens of our country. Today, and in the days to come, we will give thanks for the quick, decisive acts of first responders that prevented further tragedy. We mourn the lives that were lost, and we will honor their memory. We will pray for the families and friends of those who lost loved ones, and for those recovering from injuries sustained as the tragedy unfolded. We will not allow fear to rule our hearts—evil will not triumph against us. United we stand. Divided we fall.”

Gov. Bevin encourages individuals, businesses, organizations and government agencies to join in this tribute of lowering the flag to honor the victims and families of the Las Vegas shooting.

Louder Than Life will be making it’s annual appearance at Champions Park this weekend and weather will be just about perfect.  The two-day festival features music, food and drinks.  Headlining performances will feature Ozzy Osbourne with Zakk Wylde, Rob Zombie, Incubus, Stone Sour, Halestorm, and many more.  For the foodie, food will be showcasing many local and regional favorites ranging from fried chicken, barbecue, grilled cheese, hot dogs, tacos and gelato.  For the bourbon lover, many Kentucky bourbon distilleries will be featured, including Angel’s Envy, Jim Beam, and Buffalo Trace.

Gates open at 11:00 AM on both days.  Tickets are still available and prices range from $69.50 for Sunday only, $90 for Saturday only, $120 minimum for the entire weekend, to $280 for a VIP package.  If you are planning to attend, be sure to check the information page for what items are allowed to be taken in with you, pay close attention to the bag size restrictions.

If you have not attended the show before, check out last year’s Louder Than Life Festival.

Credit: KY State Parks

The 27th Annual Civil War Days at Columbus-Belmont State Park is Oct. 13-15.

The weekend will include battle re-enactments, history and museum tours, soldier camps, entertainment, food and more.  Admission is free.

This three-day event begins with an Education Day on Friday.  There will be cannon and rifle demonstrations, life of a soldier, and dance instruction.  Students, scouts, and groups are encouraged to participate, but everyone is invited to attend and take a closer look at history by taking a step back in time.

The opening ceremony is Friday evening with food and entertainment.  Cannons will fire from the bluffs to end the ceremony and then there will be a Ghost Walk through the Confederate earthworks with lanterns lighting the way.

Events are scheduled throughout Saturday including music and the Ladies Tea at 11 a.m.

The Civil War Ball on Saturday night will feature music and dance instruction so you don’t have to be experienced to participate.  The band for the evening is The 52nd Regimental String Band.

If you want to shop, you can find everything you need on “Sutler Row” where there will be tents set up with period clothing and accessories. There will be a Beautiful Belle and Handsome Gent contest before the dance and a Best Beard and Scraggly Beard contest during intermission.

Sunday begins with a morning service as well as a memorial service in Columbus Cemetery.

The battles are at 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. They will feature guns firing, cannons blasting, horses running, and tents burning.

The Civil War Days event is co-sponsored by Columbus-Belmont State Park, Civil War Days Committee, and the Hickman County Judge Executive’s office/Hickman County Fiscal Court.  The park is located on the Mississippi River in western Kentucky at the junction of highways 58, 80, and 123.

For more information, contact the park office at 270-677-2327 or email cindy.lynch@ky.gov or visit www.parks.ky.gov 

Photo: Kentucky Department Fish and Wildlife

Viewers of “Kentucky Afield” television picked up their phones and took to social media last weekend to submit more than 200 questions for the annual fall hunting call-in show.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources wildlife biologists Gabe Jenkins and John Morgan, along with Sgt. Rufus Cravens of the department’s Law Enforcement Division, joined “Kentucky Afield” host Chad Miles for the hour-long show that aired live on Sept. 16 on Kentucky Educational Television. The panel could not get to all of the questions before the credits started rolling.

Below, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife personnel answered a handful of the questions that did not make it on-air. Viewers who missed the live show can watch a full replay on YouTube. Enter “KYAfield” in the search box on the YouTube homepage.

Will Kentucky Fish and Wildlife consider adjusting deer seasons due to the EHD (Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease) outbreak? – Eddie from Morgan County

GABE JENKINS, Deer and Elk Program Coordinator, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife: We will not be implementing an emergency regulation to shorten or close deer season in 2017 in any county due to the EHD outbreak. We encourage folks to report all dead deer they find using our online reporting system.

After the outbreak has ceased, we will evaluate the number reported along with the harvest data from the 2017 season and make our recommendations for the 2018 season at the December meeting of the Fish and Wildlife Commission. Deer are prolific breeders, and the population will rebound within a couple years.

Lastly, if your area has experienced a severe die-off, I would encourage hunters to participate in some self-restraint and pass once you have taken enough deer to fill your freezer for the year.

How far west have elk traveled in Kentucky? – Wayne from Marion County

JENKINS: We receive reports of elk outside the elk zone almost every year. In the early years of elk restoration, we saw elk leave the elk zone more frequently. We’ve had reports of elk as far west as Lake Cumberland and one elk went to North Carolina. We have had elk harvested outside the elk zone in Bath, Carter, Laurel, Madison, Wayne and Wolfe counties.

What resources are available through Kentucky Fish and Wildlife to assist with wildlife habitat improvement? – Gary from Grayson

BEN ROBINSON, Wildlife Division Assistant Director, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife: Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is committed to assisting landowners with wildlife habitat improvement on their property. We employ more than 30 wildlife biologists who specialize in assisting private landowners with habitat management projects. From tips about improving food sources for deer and turkey to navigating cost share programs through the federal Farm Bill, we have someone available to assist you.

For more information, visit our web site at fw.ky.gov or call 1-800-858-1549 and ask for the phone number of your local private lands or farm bill biologist.

Does prescribed burning on private and public lands benefit wild turkeys? Where can I find more information? – Tony from Montgomery County

ROBINSON: Kentucky Fish and Wildlife considers prescribed fire an essential management tool for private landowners and publicly managed Wildlife Management Areas. Prescribed fires are carefully planned and managed by highly trained burn crews for containment to select areas.

We regularly use prescribed burning on grasslands and timbered areas to benefit a host of game and non-game species, including wild turkey.

Prescribed fire has many benefits. Fire removes old vegetation and stimulates new growth, providing a lush food source for wildlife. Fire promotes oak regeneration in our forests resulting in more acorns, a staple food source for many species. By removing dead vegetation, fire also creates bare ground, a necessity for bobwhite quail and other ground dwelling birds.

For more information on prescribed fire in Kentucky, visit the Kentucky Prescribed Fire Council’s website www.kyfire.org.

Why was bear season closed in McCreary County on public land? – David from McCreary County

JOHN HAST, Bear Program Coordinator, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife: Bear numbers are still low in McCreary County. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s philosophy on bear management is to allow as much hunter opportunity as the bear population will allow. What we may sacrifice in hunter opportunity in McCreary County for a few years will pay off when bears have a chance to grow within the county and expand more fully into surrounding counties, such and Pulaski and Rockcastle.

Great bear habitat lies just to the north of McCreary County within the Daniel Boone National Forest and it has the potential to provide a great place for bears and bear hunters in the future.

A population of bears is very slow in its growth and patience is necessary to see any big leaps in the season quota. You can rest assured that Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is actively monitoring bears in McCreary County in order to improve our population models. When the bear population is ready, hunters will once again be able to hunt public land.

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