Saturday December 14, 2019
News Sections

Afternoon Lecture Series
Frank Kelderman | Afloat at Locust Grove: Traversing Indian Diplomacy on the Ohio River
Wednesday, November 6, 1:15 pm

In 1842, the Choctaw diplomat Peter Pitchlynn had a chance encounter with the author Charles Dickens on a steamboat on the Ohio River, between Cincinnati and Louisville. Pitchlynn was returning from diplomatic business in Washington; Dickens was traveling the country to write his “American Notes” (1842). In this talk, Frank Kelderman takes Dickens’s account of their meeting as a starting point for exploring the Ohio River as a thoroughfare for Indian diplomacy, connecting the eastern United States to Indian country. Drawing on literature, visual art, and archival materials, this talk will give an account of indigenous presence in a region where that presence has long been unrecognized.

Frank Kelderman is an assistant professor of English at the University of Louisville, where he specializes in 19th-century Native American literature. He is the author of “Authorized Agents: Publication and Diplomacy in the Era of Indian Removal” (SUNY Press, 2019), which examines Native American writing and oratory from the Upper Missouri River to the Great Lakes. His research has also been published in the journals “American Literature,” “American Studies,” “J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists,” and “Great Plains Quarterly.”

This program is part of the city-wide program Afloat: An Ohio River Way of Life.

The Locust Grove Afternoon Lecture Series is held the first Wednesday of each month. Dessert and coffee are served at 1:00 pm with the lecture immediately following at 1:15 pm. Admission is $6, $4 for Friends of Historic Locust Grove. Reservations are not required.

Richard Bell | Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home
Thursday, November 7, 6:30 pm

Richard Bell, associate professor of Early American History at the University of Maryland, returns to Locust Grove with his new book, Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home. Stolen recounts the gripping and true story about five boys who were kidnapped in the North and smuggled into slavery in the Deep South—and their daring attempt to escape and bring their captors to justice, reminiscent of Twelve Years A Slave and Never Caught. Dr. Bell will speak about how their ordeal—an odyssey that takes them from the Philadelphia waterfront to the marshes of Mississippi and then onward still—shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of legally free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War. http://bit.ly/richardbell

Admission is $15/$12 for members. Reservations required; visit http://bit.ly/richardbell for tickets. Cash bar available; doors open at 6:00 pm.

Emilie Strong Smith Chamber Music Concert Series
Armonia e Passione: “Concerto alla Rustica”
Sunday, November 17, 5:30 pm

Enjoy a feast of Italian music for Baroque string band, with the music of Vivaldi, Marini, Bertali, and more from Armonia e Passione, a 17th-century Italian string band based in St Louis featuring Celina Casado, Stephanie Hunt, and Jeff Noonan, and led by William Bauer.

Locust Grove’s Emilie Strong Smith Chamber Music Series offers concertgoers a unique opportunity. Patrons delight in music that the Clarks and Croghans would have heard in the room where they most likely would have enjoyed it — the second-floor Great Parlor of the historic house.

Refreshments at 5:00 p.m.; concert in Locust Grove’s Great Parlor begins at 5:30 p.m. Individual concerts are $20 each. Pre-paid reservations are required–please call (502) 897-9845.

Season subscriptions may be purchased by calling Locust Grove at (502) 897-9845. Categories are Patron, $200; Supporter, $100; and Subscriber, $70.

Neighborhood Place partners offer a variety workshops and resources in November to help strengthen households including hiring events from National Processing Center and Sodexo, energy management workshops provided by Project Warm, and a Foster Parent/Adoption Information meeting. To learn more about these offerings and several others please refer to the list below.

Nov. 4, 11, 18 and 25, Kentucky Health Career Center Outreach at two locations Call 502/595-4003 for more information.  A KentuckianaWorks Health Career Center professional will provide valuable information to help increase your occupation potential including training funds for in-demand occupations; resources for individuals seeking advance healthcare careers; resume writing, career assessments; interview planning; computer essentials, work-based learning opportunities and more.

  • Nov. 4 and 25, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Nov. 11 and 18, NorthWest Neighborhood Place, 4018 W. Market St. at the Academy of Shawnee, 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.

Nov. 4, Foster Parent/Adoption Information Meeting at NorthWest Neighborhood Place, 6 – 8 p.m.
Located at 4018 W. Market St. Call 595-5437 (KIDS) for more information.  Detailed information will be provided on the requirements and process of how to become a foster or adoptive parent.  Information such as an explanation of foster care, special needs adoption, and information on foster parent training classes will be provided.  Sponsored by the Kentucky Foster Care and the Special Needs Adoption Program.

Nov. 4, 7, 8, 12, 14, 19 and 26 National Processing Center (NPC) Hiring Events at multiple locations
National Processing Center (NPC) is the U.S. Census Bureau’s primary center for mail processing, survey processing, data capture, imaging/scanning and warehouse operations. A U.S. Census Bureau’s representative will be available to share information about the hundreds of entry-level office and warehouse clerks employment opportunities for the Jeffersonville location. NPC recently increased the starting hourly pay rate for entry level clerks to $14.54 per hour!

  • Nov. 4, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 1 – 3 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.
  • Nov. 7, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place – Fairdale, 1000 Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Nov. 8, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.
  • Nov. 12, South Central Neighborhood Place,4255 Hazelwood Ave., 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Nov. 12, Ujima Neighborhood Place, 3610 Bohne Ave., 1 – 3 p.m. Call 313-4635 for more information.
  • Nov. 14, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place – Valley, 10200 Dixie Hwy., 1– 3 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Nov. 19, South Central Neighborhood Place, 4255 Hazelwood Ave., 1 – 3p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Nov. 19, Ujima Neighborhood Place, 3610 Bohne Ave., 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 313 – 4635 for more information.
  • Nov. 26, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place – Fairdale, 1000 Neighborhood Place, 1 – 3 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.

Nov. 7, Sodexo Hiring Opportunity at First Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Located at 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24).  Call 313-4700 for more information.  Sodexo, a food-service agency, will provide on-the-spot interviews for positions with Jewish Hospital, Our Lady of Peace and University of Louisville Hospital. Bring your resume and be prepared for an interview. This is one of Sodexo’s busiest hiring seasons. Stop by if you are looking for employment that can lead to a full-time or part-time position.

Nov. 14, A Healthy Journey for Two Educational Baby Shower at First Neighborhood Place, 1- 3 p.m.
Located at 1503 Rangeland Rd.  This educational baby shower is open to any expectant mothers. The class will include a range of information and resources, as well as free baby items, gift cards, prizes, and snacks. Hosted by Centerstone and KIDSNow. Fathers are welcome but must be registered. For more information, contact Mendy Mason at 502-341-5400.

Nov.  15, Energy Management Workshops at three locations
Call 636-9276 for more information.  Project Warm’s free workshops help families take control of their energy usage and learn “do-it-yourself” energy-saving tips. FREE Supplies will be distributed at the end of the workshop such as roll of clear plastic, tape, caulk/foam to seal gaps and air leaks around windows and doors.

  • Nov. 14, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place – Fairdale, 1000 Neighborhood Place, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Nov 15, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Rd. side of Thomas Jefferson Middle School, door #16, 1 – 2:30 p.m. Call 313-4728 or 313-4700 for registration.
  • Nov. 21, South Central Neighborhood Place, 4255 Hazelwood Ave, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Nov. 20, Car Seat Safety Class at NorthWest Neighborhood Place, 12 – 1 p.m.
Located at 4018 West Market St. at the Academy at Shawnee.  Call 502.574.6661 for more information.  Proper use of car seats helps keep children safe. However, with so many different seats on the market, many parents find this overwhelming. If you are expectant parents or if you have a young child(ren), join this informative class hosted by the Healthy Start program to learn how to properly install a car seat in your car to ensure vehicle safety for your child(ren).

Nov. 21, The Greatest Louisville Smoke Out at Parkhill Community Center, 5 – 7 p.m.
Located at 1703 S. 13th Street.  For more information, call Celine at 502/341-0694 and inquire about possible transportation assistance by November 14.  The event focuses on connecting the community to promote smoking cessation and to answer questions about the quitline, medications and health services, and one-on-one coaching.  Features health screenings, a cooking demonstration, free food, door prizes, photo booth, games, vendors and photo booth.  Transportation assistance may be available  Sponsored in part by the Shawnee Healthcare Center, Bridges of Hope Neighborhood Place and other community partners.

This month at Locust Grove:

Afternoon Lecture Series
Stuart Sanders: Kentucky Duels
Wednesday, October 2, 1:15 pm

You’re aware of Alexander Hamilton’s duel with Aaron Burr, but did you know that there were some remarkable affairs of honor in Kentucky? Join author and public historian Stuart W. Sanders to discuss some of the Commonwealth’s most remarkable duels and their impact on the Bluegrass State. It’s a lecture at ten paces!
The Locust Grove Afternoon Lecture Series is held the first Wednesday of each month. Dessert and coffee are served at 1:00 pm with the lecture immediately following at 1:15 pm. Admission is $6, $4 for Friends of Historic Locust Grove. Reservations are not required.
Part of The Age of Hamilton series at Locust Grove.

Frankenstein: A Reading Performance by Kentucky Shakespeare
Tuesday, October 22, 7:00 pm

Right in time for Halloween, join Kentucky Shakespeare in the great parlor inside Locust Grove’s historic home as they bring this classic story to life in a staged reading performance. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley wrote and published Frankenstein during the Croghan’s occupancy of Locust Grove, making this a perfect melding of worlds to mark the season. Light refreshments provided. Tickets $20 per person or $15 for Locust Grove members; prepaid reservations required. Visit http://bit.ly/lgfrankenstein to reserve.  Doors open at 6:00 pm; performance begins at 7:00 pm.

18th Century Market Fair
Saturday, October 26 and Sunday, October 27 10:00 am – 4:30 pm

Experience the 18th century with all five senses! You are invited to join Locust Grove and the Illinois Regiment of Virginia as we bring the spirit of the past alive with the Market Fair. You can participate in 18th-century style entertainment, purchase replicas of 18th-century military and household items and enjoy food and drink as our founders did. See the sheep, and horses, and meet and converse with early Americans. Mock battles for our country’s independence feature General George Rogers Clark’s own company, the Illinois Regiment of Virginia, as well as British Dragoons and Marines. Admission $8 adults, $4 children.

Photo: Neighborhood Place

Each month, Neighborhood Place partners provide numerous events and resources to benefit the entire family.  Activities in October include two Trunk or Treat events for Halloween, nine hiring events conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, “A Healthy Journey for Two Educational Baby Shower” at two locations and more.  To learn more about these offerings, please refer to the list below.

Oct 1, 3, 4, 9, 17, 18 and 29, U.S. Census Bureau’s Hiring Events at multiple locations
U.S. Census Bureau’s representative will be available to share information about the hundreds of entry-level office & warehouse clerks employment opportunities for the Jeffersonville location. National Processing Center (NPC) is the U.S. Census Bureau’s primary center for mail processing, survey processing, data capture, imaging/scanning and warehouse operations. NPC recently increased the starting hourly pay rate for entry level clerks to $14.54 per hour.

  • Oct. 1, Ujima Neighborhood Place, 3610 Bohne Ave., 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 485-6710 for more information.
  • Oct. 1, First Neighborhood Place at 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 1– 3 p.m.   Call 313-4700 for more information.
  • Oct. 3, South Central Neighborhood Place at 4255 Hazelwood Ave, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Oct. 4, First Neighborhood Place at 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.
  • Oct. 9, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place – Fairdale Location at 1000 Neighborhood Place (off National Turnpike),10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Oct. 17, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place – Valley at 10200 Dixie Highway (inside Valley High School to the right of the bldg.), 1 – 3 p.m.  Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Oct.18, South Central Neighborhood Place at 4255 Hazelwood Ave., 9 – 11 a.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • Oct. 18, Ujima Neighborhood Place, 3610 Bohne Ave., 1 -3 p.m. Call 485-6710 for more information.
  • Oct. 29, First Neighborhood Place at 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 1 – 3 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.

Oct. 3, Sodexo Hiring Opportunity at First Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Located at 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24).  Call 313-4700 for more information.Sodexo, a food-service agency, will provide on-the-spot interviews for positions with Jewish Hospital, Our Lady of Peace and University of Louisville Hospital. Bring your resume and be prepared for an interview. This is one of Sodexo’s busiest hiring seasons. Stop by if you are looking for employment that can lead to a full-time or part-time position.

Oct. 14, and 28, Kentucky Health Career Center Outreach
A KentuckianaWorks Health Career Center professional will provide valuable information to help increase your occupation potential; Training funds for in-demand occupations, Resources for individuals seeking advance healthcare careers; resume writing provided, career assessments, Interview planning  success, Computer essentials, Work-based learning opportunities and more.

  • Oct. 14, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 10a.m. – 1 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.
  • Oct. 28, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 10a.m. – 1 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.

Oct. 9 and 15, A Healthy Journey for Two Educational Baby Shower at two locations.
For more information, contact Mendy Mason at 502-341-5400.  A Healthy Journey for Two is an educational baby shower open to any expectant mother.  The class will include a range of information and resources, as well as free baby items, gift cards, prizes, and snacks.  Hosted by Centerstone and KIDSNow.  Fathers are welcome but must be registered.

  • Oct. 9, Ujima Neighborhood Place, 3610 Bohne Ave., 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Oct. 15, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Rd., 1 – 3 p.m.

Oct. 17, The Center for Women and Families Outreach at First Neighborhood Place, 12 – 3 p.m.
Located at1503 Rangeland Rd (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24).  For more information, contact Nayelyi Sanchez, Domestic Violence Advocate at (502) 581-7270.  Staff with the Center for Women and Families will be on-hand to give an overview of their services which include trauma-informed advocacy and support for qualified families and individuals with supportive services, emergency shelter, sexual assault services, housing, children’s services and more.

Oct. 24, Trunk or Treat at Carter Traditional School/DuValle Education Center parking lot 5:30 – 7 p.m.
Located at the backside of 3610 Bohne Ave.  For more information call 313-4635. This annual Halloween event provides a safe and fun environment for the entire family with trick or treating in a line-up of vehicles with trunks full of goodies.

Oct. 28, Trunk or Treat Halloween Health and Safety Fair at South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, 6 – 8 p.m.

Located at 1000 Neighborhood Place.  Call 363-1483 for more information.  Join the Third Annual Trunk or Treat and Health Fair guaranteed to surprise and delight kids of all ages.  Free health related items, candy, movies, treats and games.  Dress in your favorite costume and join the fun.

Bloomberg Philanthropies, through its What Works Cities initiatives, has selected Louisville as one of five American cities to implement an innovative early childhood education program designed to empower parents and caregivers with tools to support language development at a critical age — and help children enter kindergarten classroom ready.

The National Center for Families Learning (NCFL), in partnership with Louisville Metro Government, Jefferson County Public Schools, Metro United Way, and other community partners that make up the Ready for K Alliance, will expand its Say & Play with Words initiative. This expansion will incorporate the curriculum of Providence Talks, a Bloomberg-funded program in Providence, R.I. In addition to Bloomberg Philanthropies, Say & Play with Words is funded by Lift a Life Foundation, Louisville Metro Government, PNC Grow Up Great®, Metro United Way, the Gheens Foundation, and C. E. and S. Foundation.

“We’re thankful to Bloomberg Philanthropies and our local partners for supporting Louisville families with the needed support to be ready for school on Day 1,” Mayor Greg Fischer said. “Louisville is in a period of unprecedented economic momentum, but we know the benefits aren’t being experienced equally across the community. There’s a disparity with deep and disturbing roots in our history. Through efforts such as Say & Play with Words, SummerWorks, Evolve502 and more, our core city value of lifelong learning continues to be a major piece of our efforts to erase this disparity.”

The expanded Say & Play with Words program, championed and supported by the community partners over the next three years, will be centered on creating playgroups and parent groups in targeted Louisville ZIP code areas that demonstrate high percentages of children not ready for kindergarten.

NCFL will serve as the lead implementor of the expansion, building on existing city infrastructure with new and current NCFL partner sites. The local effort will integrate innovative LENA (Language ENvironment Analysis) technology to track and measure words used in the home to gauge parent behavior change as a result of participation. Over three years, more than 1,200 families will participate in Say & Play with Words.

“The National Center for Families Learning is excited to lead our community partners in the expansion of Say & Play with Words. This inaugural support from Bloomberg Philanthropies allows us to engage parents and children together in informal settings like play groups and parent-facilitated parent groups. In our 30 years of working with millions of families across the country, we have found that the two key ingredients to support the success of the family are: empowering parents through education and bringing the family together to learn.” Sharon Darling, CEO & Founder of NCFL shared.

Combined with local investments, the support provided across five cities totals nearly $12 million over three years. The other four cities that are replicating Providence Talks are: Birmingham, AL; Detroit, MI; Hartford, CT; and Virginia Beach, VA.

Providence Talks was the first-ever Grand Prize Winner of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Mayors Challenge, an innovation competition that awards and promotes cities with bold, inventive ideas that address urgent challenges and have the most potential for impact and the ability to spread to other cities.

The program provides families with a small recording LENA device known as a ‘word pedometer’ that counts adult words spoken in a child’s presence, as well as the number of conversational interactions a child engages in during the day. Research shows that robust exposure to words and conversation—from birth to age four—is crucial for children’s vocabulary building and brain development.

“Providence Talks shows just why we launched the Mayors Challenge: to help cities take on big challenges, test innovative ideas, and then spread what works best,” said Michael Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies and the 108th Mayor of New York City. “Providence Talks has had promising results, helping thousands of young children increase their language development. Today, we’re glad to help five new cities adapt the program and work to achieve similar progress.”

A Brown University study of Providence Talks found:

  • Children who participated in the program made significant gains in the number of words they heard and turns they took in conversations and in language development.
  • In the Home Visitation model, 56% of all children showed growth in the number of adult words they heard and 42% increased their number of turns taken in conversations.
  • In the Playgroup model, 73% of all the children showed growth in the number of adult words they hear daily and 56% increased their number of turns taken in conversations.
  • The largest gains were seen in children who started the furthest behind. These children, on average, showed a 51% growth in the number of adult words they hear daily, going from an average of 8,000 to over 12,100 words per day. This jump from the 11th to the 42nd percentile in eight months is substantial, moving from the lowest quartile of words heard to about the average level.
  • By the end of the program, children in the program showed, on average, a 15 percentile point increase in the Developmental Snapshot score, a tool used to measure a child’s development progress (or language skills).

Bloomberg Philanthropies will support this programming with grants in each city. Cities will also receive the technology and software, including talk pedometer devices, software, and other tools required to replicate the approach. These critical technological resources are provided by LENA, a national nonprofit organization that develops technology to measure talk.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Fund for the Arts announced today that the popular Cultural Pass, an annual summer program that provides free arts access to youth and children in Greater Louisville, will now expand to year-round availability.

Thanks to a generous donation by Republic Bank, the Cultural Pass will continue beyond summer with a performing arts component, allowing young people to attend performances and engage in the performing arts throughout the year. Expanding the Cultural Pass to a year-round program gives children and families admission to free, curriculum-based performance arts and cultural experiences that enhance academic development.

“Cultural Pass creates an opportunity for lifelong learning by establishing longstanding relationships between our city’s arts and culture institutions and our youth, starting at age 0,” said the Mayor. “With the expansion of the program, Cultural Pass is poised to have a greater impact on the lives of more young people.”

Currently, residents of Jefferson and Bullitt counties in Kentucky and Floyd, Clark and Harrison Counties in Southern Indiana have access to the Cultural Pass. Performing arts venues confirmed so far for the Cultural Pass expansion include Actors Theatre, Louisville Ballet, StageOne Family Theatre, Commonwealth Theatre Company, Kentucky Opera, Louisville Orchestra, and Louisville Free Public Library.

The Cultural Pass was created in 2014 by Louisville Metro Government as part of Vision Louisville. It is one of several strategies designed to help prevent summer learning loss and to keep students engaged in educational activities. Since its debut, more than 200,000 passes have been distributed to Greater Louisville’s youth, allowing them to visit more than 59 arts venues and cultural institutions.

Last year, Cultural Passes were used for more than 35,000 visits to Louisville’s arts and cultural attractions, with low-income children accounting for 14,000 of those visits. Participation by low-income children increased 44 percent from the previous year.

Expanding the pass beyond the summer months into the performing arts seasons was a goal in the Imagine 2020 cultural plan, and an Ignite Louisville team of local professionals helped make it possible.

“This is the very definition of creating arts access,” said Christen Boone, President & CEO of the Fund for the Arts. “We are thrilled to expand the pass to the performing arts seasons so that our children can experience the power of live theatre, ballet, orchestra and more – further broadening their view of their community and the world.”

Fund for the Arts manages the program’s daily operations, with an oversight committee comprised of representatives from the Mayor’s Office, Arts and Culture Alliance, Louisville Free Public Library and Jefferson County Public Schools guiding the program.

Expansion of the program will allow Cultural Pass holders, ages 0 to 21, to gain access to one performance at each of the participating performing arts venues during the school year. One adult is provided a pass to accompany children under the age of 17. To learn more, visit www.fundforthearts.org/culturalpass.

“Republic Bank is honored and proud to support youth arts access,” said Steve Trager, CEO of Republic Bank. “We see this as an opportunity to invest in the future of our city by supporting the educational opportunities of young people. It’s truly a ‘win-win’ for everyone.”

September is Kentucky Archaeology Month, a time dedicated to educating the public about what professional archaeologists do, the methods and techniques of archaeology, and what archaeology can tell us about the history of our state and the people who lived here before us.

For the fourth year, the Kentucky Heritage Council/State Historic Preservation Office (KHC) is hosting a blog, “30 Days of Kentucky Archaeology,” with brief essays by archaeologists, students, and public historians on topics ranging from earthworks to 3D scanning to native plants. Follow at www.30daysofkentuckyarchaeology.wordpress.com.

“The blog is a great way for archaeologists to highlight their research taking place in Kentucky. These blogs let us see how archaeology connects us to those who have come before us through common material culture, food, experiences, and more,” said KHC archaeologist Karen Stevens, organizer.

The 2019 Kentucky Archaeology Month poster features the Paleoindian Period in Kentucky, the first time a single archaeological era has been the focus. The Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists (KyOPA) will offer free copies of the poster at events throughout the state and has also posted an online calendar at their website, www.kyopa.org.

  • Archaeologist Dr. Stephen McBride will discuss the evolution of Camp Nelson – from farmland to Civil War fortification to county park to National Monument – at 6:30 p.m. EDT Monday, Sept 9 at Paul Sawyier Public Library, Frankfort. The presentation is free and sponsored by the library, the Frankfort Civil War Roundtable, and Capital City Museum. No registration required; for information see www.pspl.org/event/camp-nelson/.
  • Corn Island Archaeology will host a public archaeology dig at the Conrad-Seaton House, 10320 Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown, during the annual Gaslight Festival Sept. 13-15. Visitors are invited to stop by to chat or help excavate.
  • “Bourbon Archaeologist” Nick Laracuente will present “Forgotten Distilleries: An Introduction to Bourbon Archaeology” at 6 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Sept. 17, at Paul Sawyier Public Library and again at 6 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 18, at Scott County Public Library. Laracuente will step back in time to explore findings from archaeological investigations at two farm distilleries in Woodford County and what these forgotten histories can teach us about life and distilling in 1800s Kentucky.

    Both presentations are free but online registration is requested for the Frankfort event. Registration for the Scott County presentation is optional.

  • The largest annual public archaeology event in Kentucky, Living Archaeology Weekend, will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. EDT Saturday, Sept. 21, at Gladie Visitor Center in the Red River Gorge area of Daniel Boone National Forest. This free, family-friendly event features hands-on demonstrations of American Indian and pioneer lifeways and technologies, including hide tanning, spinning, flintknapping, and open-hearth cooking. For information and a list of sponsors, visit www.livingarchaeologyweekend.org.
  • Also Sept 21, Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site and KHC will co-sponsor Archaeology Day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. CDT. Hands-on demonstrations and activities will include a mock excavation, spear and atlatl throwing, flint knapping, finger and basket weaving, pottery making, and other crafts. Visitors can participate in a drum circle, play musical instruments from indigenous cultures, and view displays of Native American foods and gourds. Admission is $5 for adults and $4 for children, seniors, and military service members. See http://bit.ly/2Zy63Ti for more.

Archaeology Month activities celebrate the professional practice of archaeology and its value to the Commonwealth as well as the importance of protecting and preserving historic and prehistoric archaeological resources. Thousands of archaeological sites have been documented across the state and some are listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

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