Wednesday October 18, 2017
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Southwest Festival This Weekend

The Southwest Festival, a one-day event, starts tomorrow at Sun Valley Community Center in Valley Station.  Following tradition, the Valley’s Woman’s Club will host a Bean Soup Dinner tonight, starting at 4:30 PM. All proceeds from the dinner will go to support the club.

Starting at 8:00 AM on Saturday, Plumb Lodge #862 will host their annual pancake breakfast. All proceeds from the breakfast go to fun their scholarship fund. This year the event will be headlined by the Louisville Crashers.  Other attractions include Toddler Town, Kids’ City, Teen City, chance to meet many local businesses, and the annual car and motorcycle show.  Food and drinks will be available for purchase on site.

While the event itself is free, parking will be $5 per vehicle, and includes a chance to win one of the many door prizes.  Festival organizers request that attendees leave their pets at home, only service animals will be allowed into the festival area.

 

Meijer presents “The World’s Largest Halloween Party!”

October 5–8, 12–15, 19–22, & 26–29, 2017

It’s that time of year when the Louisville Zoo transforms into a storybook land and a photo opportunity is waiting around every corner during the Zoo’s “World’s Largest Halloween Party!” presented by Meijer. This year the Zoo celebrates its 36th year of the popular party on October 5–8, 12–15, 19–22, & 26–29, 2017

Tickets are now on sale.

Children can dress up in their wildest costumes and set off on a magical journey through the Zoo.
The Party features costumed characters for guests to meet and greet in fanciful, larger-than-life storybook scenes. Trick-or-treating is offered for kids 11 and under. In an effort to be “green,” the Zoo requests that children bring their own trick-or-treat bag to the event. The Zoo will not provide bags, but reusable cloth bags will be available for purchase for $2 in the Zoo’s gift shop whiles supplies last.

Louisville pumpkin carving artist Donna O’Bryan will have her beautifully carved artificial pumpkins on display nightly in the Glacier Run Black Cat Crossing area with cutout themes ranging from iconic movie characters to famous stars.

Fun themed areas include:   Continue reading

Fans of all genres of rock, from 80’s-style glam-rock to speed metal, packed Lousville’s Champions Park, as they have since the Louder Than Life started in 2014.

Across the two day event, three dozen bands played three stages to a mass of tens of thousands of fist-pumping, crowd-surfing, mosh-pitting concert goers.  While main stage acts like Ozzy Osbourne, Rob Zombie, Five Finger Death Punch, Incubus, Stone Sour, and supergroup Prophets of Rage drew the largest crowd, the performers kept the excitement going from the opening show just after noon each day well into the night until the final curtain.

The opening-day first chords were struck on one of the two main stages by New Jersey hardcore act, Palisades and, shortly after, the other end of the 200+ acre venue on the Zorn Stage by He Is Legend.  The shows continued throughout Saturday with more acts including DED, Of Mice and Men, Steel Panther, Five Finger Death Punch, Mastodon, Rob Zombie, and Eagles of Death Metal (EODM) – who gained unfortunate notoriety when, in 2015, terrorists attacked the Bataclan Theater in Paris while the band was on stage.

On moving on, EODM bassist Matt McJunkins told a CNN reporter shortly after the attack, “music is what we do, it’s our lives, and there’s no way we’re not going to keep doing it.”  And “keep doing it” they did, as they rocked a packed Loudmouth Stage crowd during their set.

The show continued Saturday through Ozzy Osbourne’s closing act, during which apologized to the crowd several times as his voice cracked and went off-pitch.  Voice issues are nothing new for The Godfather of Heavy Metal; in a 2007 interview, the Prince of Darkness told the News TribuneI get a lot of voice problems. You have to do a lot of shouting, you know. […] I had a little bit of voice trouble. But it seems to be getting better now, you know.

Last year, Ozzy opened up to Kerrang! magazine that the one thing he fears is losing his voice, saying that, unlike a guitar player who could simply get another instrument, singers only get one voice.  During face-melting guitar solos by Zakk Wylde and an unbelievable, extended drum solo by Tommy Clufetos, Ozzy sipped tea, chewed gum and popped lozenges, eventually gaining back his voice and putting on a fantastic show.

Despite being a massive music festival, heavy tunes and head-banging is not all that the event offers, as indicated by the other two-thirds of Louder Than Life’s of Music, Whiskey, and Grub.

Stretched between the Monster and Loudmouth Stages at one end and Zorn Stage at the opposite end, Champions Park was lined with a variety of vendors, displays, and attractions – everything from purveyors of booze and greasy fried festival food to swag merchants and USMC recruiting opportunities.  Everything looked and smelled good, although our editors can personally vouch for Rock n Roll BBQ as the perfect fuel for hungry festival goers.

Often accompanying what can easily turn into an all-day drinking contest in the hot sun are rowdy types.  However, out of control ne’er-do-wells have been absent from the Louder Than Life events that we have witnessed.  LMPD officers are on hand to help reign in unruly behavior, but they appeared to be able to spend the vast majority of their time handling access control and taking in the music and people watching rather than dealing with rowdy types.

EMTs are also on hand; thankfully they mainly work to keep people hydrated and patch up minor scrapes rather than dealing with any real injuries – which might come as a surprise to outsiders watching what might otherwise appear as a violent scene inside a mosh pit.  A number of festival attendees were making their way around the event in wheelchairs, but – as best as we could tell – they arrived thusly equipped… several of them even participating in the crowd surfing, chair and all.  The mosh pits, though few and far between given the heavy nature of the on-stage performances, were fast paced yet respectful for participants, who came away mostly unscathed.

One exception was Nick, who, during Stone Sour’s Sunday set, caught an inadvertent elbow to his sunglasses and got a cut over his eye.  Though winded, Nick was in good spirits and both he and his friend described the situation as “pretty metal!

The high-energy show continued Sunday, kicked off by Black Map and Louder Than Life alums, ’68.  The day continued with acts including Falling in Reverse, Greta Van Fleet, and Palaye Royale.

Sunday also featured a powerful lineup of metal bands with female leads, including Lzzy Hale’s Halestorm, former Cindy Lou Who Taylor Momsen’s The Pretty Reckless, Cristina Scabbia with gothic staple Lacuna Coil, and In This Moment, featuring two-time “Rock Goddess of the Year” and Revolver’s “Hottest Chick in Metal,” Maria Brink.

If the atmosphere during the rest of the event could be described as electric, Sunday night’s main stage performances ratcheted things up to another level of high voltage.

Chicago’s hardcore Rise Against ignited the crowed with a high-speed set that incited an ocean of crowd surfers that only swelled more once lead singer Tim McIlrath descended from the stage to mount the stage barrier and greet fans lucky enough to surf his way as he belted out lyrics.

Sunday’s energy continued as Corey Taylor, returning after his 2017 Louder Than Life headline performance with Slipknot, led Stone Sour through blistering vocals and heavy drum and guitar backing while dousing the front rows of the moshing crowd with bottled water.

Calabasas-based perennial favorite Incubus calmed the crowd a bit during their set under cool blue lighting, Brandon Boyd’s melodic vocals, and mellower tunes.

The slowdown did not last long, however, as the weekend-long festival wrapped up on a high note with rap-rock supergroup, Prophets of Rage – comprised of Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave‘s Tom Morello, Tim Commerford, and Brad Wilk; Public Enemy‘s Chuck D and DJ Lord; and Cypress Hill‘s B-Real.

Pumping fists in the sky, the crowd – who likely sang as much of the songs as those on stage – took the performers’ lyrical advice to get out their seats and jump around to heart and stayed mobile throughout the show.

During their set, the band performed a somber Like a Stone tribute to fellow Audioslave member and former Soundgarden frontman, Chris Cornell – who died earlier this year in May – amidst a sea of cell phone lights and lighter flames before continuing their high-energy set through their final performance, Killing in the Name.

Rock and metal fans were treated to an outstanding weekend of Louder Than Life’s trademark music, bourbon, and “gourmet man food,” and left the venue, as always, excited for the next iteration of the festival.  Fans are, no doubt, anxiously awaiting new of what the five-year anniversary of the event holds in store.

Check out more photos from Louder Than Life 2017 below and on our Facebook gallery.

Louder Than Life will be making it’s annual appearance at Champions Park this weekend and weather will be just about perfect.  The two-day festival features music, food and drinks.  Headlining performances will feature Ozzy Osbourne with Zakk Wylde, Rob Zombie, Incubus, Stone Sour, Halestorm, and many more.  For the foodie, food will be showcasing many local and regional favorites ranging from fried chicken, barbecue, grilled cheese, hot dogs, tacos and gelato.  For the bourbon lover, many Kentucky bourbon distilleries will be featured, including Angel’s Envy, Jim Beam, and Buffalo Trace.

Gates open at 11:00 AM on both days.  Tickets are still available and prices range from $69.50 for Sunday only, $90 for Saturday only, $120 minimum for the entire weekend, to $280 for a VIP package.  If you are planning to attend, be sure to check the information page for what items are allowed to be taken in with you, pay close attention to the bag size restrictions.

If you have not attended the show before, check out last year’s Louder Than Life Festival.

Credit: KY State Parks

The 27th Annual Civil War Days at Columbus-Belmont State Park is Oct. 13-15.

The weekend will include battle re-enactments, history and museum tours, soldier camps, entertainment, food and more.  Admission is free.

This three-day event begins with an Education Day on Friday.  There will be cannon and rifle demonstrations, life of a soldier, and dance instruction.  Students, scouts, and groups are encouraged to participate, but everyone is invited to attend and take a closer look at history by taking a step back in time.

The opening ceremony is Friday evening with food and entertainment.  Cannons will fire from the bluffs to end the ceremony and then there will be a Ghost Walk through the Confederate earthworks with lanterns lighting the way.

Events are scheduled throughout Saturday including music and the Ladies Tea at 11 a.m.

The Civil War Ball on Saturday night will feature music and dance instruction so you don’t have to be experienced to participate.  The band for the evening is The 52nd Regimental String Band.

If you want to shop, you can find everything you need on “Sutler Row” where there will be tents set up with period clothing and accessories. There will be a Beautiful Belle and Handsome Gent contest before the dance and a Best Beard and Scraggly Beard contest during intermission.

Sunday begins with a morning service as well as a memorial service in Columbus Cemetery.

The battles are at 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. They will feature guns firing, cannons blasting, horses running, and tents burning.

The Civil War Days event is co-sponsored by Columbus-Belmont State Park, Civil War Days Committee, and the Hickman County Judge Executive’s office/Hickman County Fiscal Court.  The park is located on the Mississippi River in western Kentucky at the junction of highways 58, 80, and 123.

For more information, contact the park office at 270-677-2327 or email cindy.lynch@ky.gov or visit www.parks.ky.gov 

Credit: KY State Parks

Step back in time as Big Bone Lick State Historic Site returns to days long past during the 35th annual Salt Festival the weekend of Oct. 13-15.

The festival features demonstrations of pioneer living, frontier skills, traditions, and lifeways. Browse the crafters corner to see the many handcrafted items for sale and find lots of good eats at the food court.  Enjoy folk and bluegrass music, listen to a storyteller, view prehistoric Ice Age artifacts, and observe a blacksmith working red-hot iron.  See how salt was extracted from the waters of Big Bone, watch a flintknapper make a stone point, and discover how bison hair was spun into yarn.

While visiting the park, be sure to drop by the park’s museum and visitor’s center to see some of the “big bones.” A shuttle van will transport event-goers to and from the festival field to the center at regular intervals.  Don’t miss seeing the bison herd, the park’s living link to Kentucky’s early history.

On Friday, Oct. 13, the park will host school groups. The cost is $2 per person. Schools interested in bringing classes to the festival should call the park at 859-384-3522.

Regular festival admission is $5 per person; children 5 and under are free.

For information about the park, visit http://parks.ky.gov/parks/historicsites/big-bone-lick/.  Big Bone Lick State Historic Site is recognized as the birthplace of American vertebrate paleontology for its significant role in the development of scientific thought regarding extinction and the relationship between geology and paleontology the world over. The park is located 22 miles southwest of Covington on KY 338, off US 42/127 and I-71 & I-75.  From I-75 north or south, take exit 175 to KY 338.  From I-71 north or south, take exit 62 to 127N/42E to KY 338.

Photo: State Treasurer website

Kentucky State Treasurer Allison Ball was selected as one of twenty-five participants for The Governing Institute’s 2018 Women in Government Leadership Program.

“It is an honor to be selected for The Governing Institute’s Women in Leadership Program,” Treasurer Ball said. “We need more women to run for office and I am proud to be a part of this program that encourages women to assume a greater level of leadership.”

The Women in Leadership Program brings together elected female leaders from across the nation to acknowledge their contributions, create a forum to discuss leadership, and seek their help in mentoring the next generation of female leaders to run for office. Each class also includes one rising star, a young woman not yet serving in elected office, but with the interest and potential to run in the future.

The Governing Institute is a division of e.Republic, the nation’s only media and research company focused exclusively on state and local government and education. Governing focuses on improving government performance and outcomes through research, decision support, and executive education to help public sector leaders govern more effectively.

“The women in the Class of 2018 are subject matter experts, negotiators, civic activists, and pioneers,” said Julia Burrows, director of the Governing Institute. Nominations were received for nearly 150 women for the Class of 2018. The class was selected based on career and educational accomplishments, personal recommendations, a commitment to actively participate and the goal of seating a diverse class. The 25 women in the program’s new class will be profiled in the February 2018 issue of Governing magazine and will participate in Governing events throughout the coming year.

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