Wednesday July 18, 2018
News Topics

Neighborhood Place partners offer a variety of resources and services in July including the BB&T Bank Bus at two locations, a forum entitledVoices of Addiction: Examining the Stages of Change”, as well as the Back to School Festival at Valley High School To learn more about these offerings and several others please refer to the list below.

July 2 and 5, BB&T Bank Bus at two locations
The BB&T Bank Bus is a 40-foot mobile classroom providing credit report education, unclaimed property searches, self-file income tax preparation stations, as well as comprehensive financial services. BB&T personnel will also be available to help with checking and savings accounts and other financial services and provide access to computer-based “Money Smart Financial Education”.

  • July 2, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Rd., side of Thomas Jefferson Middle School, 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. Call (313-4700 for more information
  • July 5, South Central Neighborhood Place, 4255 Hazelwood Ave., 1 -5 p.m. Call 485-7130 for more information.

July 2, 9, 10, 16, 17, 24, 30Passport Health Care Community Engagement at multiple locations
Passport Members are invited to join with representatives from Passport Health Care for one-on-one consultations to discuss plan benefits and options.   This is a great opportunity as Passport aims to raise awareness and educate the community about the Passport Health Plan mission.  Passport members will receive a $10 retail gift card for attending.

  • July 2, 9, 16 and 30, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Rd (door #16) side of Thomas Jefferson Middle School. Call (502) 313-4700 for more information.
  • July 10, NorthWest Neighborhood Place, 4018 W. Market St. at the Academy of Shawnee, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.  Call 313-4892 for more information.
  • July 10, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, 1000 Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. Call 363-1483 for more information.
  • July 17, South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, 1000 Neighborhood Place,  1:00 p.m.  Passport membership education meeting.  Call 313-4635 for more information.
  • July 24, Ujima Neighborhood Place, 11 a.m.  Call 485-6710 for more information.

July 3, Car Seat Safety Check at Ujima Neighborhood Place, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 
Located at 3610 Bohne Ave.  Call Norton Children’s Hospital at 629-7358 to make an appointment.  Learn how to install your child’s car seat or booster seat. Find out if it’s time for a change.  Car seat-fitting by appointment only.

July 5, FedEx Ground Employment Opportunities at First Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Located at 1503 Rangeland Rd. Call (502) 313-4700 for more information.  A FedEx human resources recruiter will talk one-on-one with individuals interested in a career as a package handler with FedEx Ground.

July 5 and 9, Sodexo Hiring Opportunities at two locations
Sodexo, a food-service agency, will provide on-the-spot interviews for positions with Jewish Hospital, Our Lady of Peace and University of Louisville Hospital. Bring your resume and be prepared for an interview. This is one of Sodexo’s busiest hiring seasons. Stop by if you are looking for employment that can lead to a full-time or part-time position.

  • July 5, First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24), 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Call 313-4700 for more information.
  • July 9, South Central Neighborhood Place, 4255 Hazelwood Ave., 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Call 485-7130 for more information.

July 5, American Red Cross Blood Drive at Charmoli Center Neighborhood Place, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Located at 200 Juneau Drive, Suite 200, conference room.  Call 574-8147 for more information. Giving blood is a simple thing to do, but it can make a big difference in the lives of others. It is best to reach out in advance to pre-register, however, walk-ins the day of the event will be accepted.

July 12, A Healthy Journey for Two Educational Baby Shower at First Neighborhood Place
Located at 1503 Rangeland Rd.  For more information or to register, contact Mendy Mason at 502-341-5400.  This educational baby shower open to any expectant mothers. The class will include a range of information and resources, as well as free baby items, gift cards, prizes, and snacks. Hosted by Seven Counties and KIDSNow.

Mondays, July 23 – September 17, “4 Your Child Dads Making The Difference” at Ujima Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.    
Located at 3610 Bohne Ave  For more information or to register for the upcoming weekly workshops, please contact Dr. Cheri Langley at 709-9323 or by email at 4YourChild@Outlook.com.  “4 Your Child” is an eight-week fatherhood program that aims to improve the quantity and quality of fathers’ involvement by integrating responsible parenting, economic stability, and relationship education services.  Participants may be compensated for their time up to $220 but registration is required.

July 24, “Voices of Addiction: Examining the Stages of Change” at St. Ann’s, 5- 7 p.m.
Located at 1515 Algonquin Pkwy.  Call 634-6057 for more information.  Part of the “Addiction 101” series, “Voices of Addiction: Examining the Stages of Change” is a forum that allows individuals living with the disease of addiction the opportunity to tell their addiction stories.  Their stories center around the stages of change, pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance, relapse and transcendence.  Sponsored by Bridges of Hope Neighborhood Place.

July 26, Back to School Festival at Valley High School, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Located at 10200 Dixie Highway.  For more information call 363-1483.  This annual event is open to families with children in kindergarten through high school.  School supplies and backpacks will be provided while supplies last to families that participate in three, ten-minute ‘mini-trainings’ concentrated on what you need as a family to get through the year.  Over twenty presenters and more than forty vendors will be at the event plus mascots and lots of hands on fun to help everyone “Unlock Your Superhero Powers”.  Sponsored by South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, Cane Run Neighborhood Place, Louisville Metro Office of Resilience and Community Services, South Jefferson Community Partnership, Drug-Free Communities Grant, 17 area JCPS and Family Resource and Youth Service Centers, Kidz Club, Kosair Charities, Fairdale Christian Church, and  Fairdale First Baptist Church.

The number of people in Louisville who are getting hepatitis A continues to grow.  As of today, there have been 478 cases and three deaths.    Here are 10 key things to know:

  1. The hepatitis A virus is being spread through person to person contact:  Sharing a home, a cigarette, marijuana joint, a drink, or sex with someone  who has the virus puts you at high risk.
  2. There have been cases of hepatitis A in every Louisville ZIP code.
  3. While the outbreak is largely centered in people who use drugs (any kind of drug use, not just injecting) and people who are homeless, 1 out of 8 cases report no risk factors.
  4. More than 60 percent of the 478 people who have had hepatitis A have been hospitalized.  Getting hepatitis A can make you very sick.
  5. A person can have hepatitis A for up to 2 weeks before symptoms ever develop.  During that 2 weeks they are contagious and exposing others to the virus.
  6. The hepatitis A virus can live for a long time on surfaces.  Disinfecting kitchens and particularly any restroom open to public use with a solution of bleach and water is the most effective way to kill the virus. Specific disinfection guidelines can be found here.
  7. Washing your hands thoroughly and often with warm water and soap is a way to protect yourself from many diseases, including hepatitis A.  Be aware that hand sanitizer has not been proven as effective as handwashing against hepatitis A.
  8. For the best protection, you need to be vaccinated against hepatitis A.  The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness as well as the Kentucky Department for Public Health have been encouraging residents of Jefferson and any other counties with a hepatitis A outbreak to get vaccinated for several months.  “Our hepatitis A outbreak will stop when the majority of our Louisville residents are vaccinated,” said Dr. Sarah Moyer, director, Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness.
  9. Most health insurance plans should cover 100 percent of the cost of the hepatitis A vaccination.  If your pharmacist or healthcare provider tells you there’s a cost, contact your health insurance provider to find out where they allow you to get vaccinated at no cost.
  10. If you get diagnosed with hepatitis A and we call you, please talk to us.  When someone gets infected with a communicable disease, a nurse or epidemiologist from Public Health and Wellness will contact them.  Any information you share is protected and helps us make progress in stopping the spread of hepatitis A.

For more information about hepatitis A visit https://louisvilleky.gov/government/health-wellness/hepatitis or call 211.

An employee of the White Castle restaurant at 2350 Greene Way has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis A.

Customers who ate at this White Castle from May 29, 2018 to June 8, 2018 may have been exposed to the hepatitis A virus.  While the risk of contracting hepatitis A from eating at this restaurant is low, the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness is issuing this advisory out of an abundance of caution.  The hepatitis A outbreak remains centered among who use illegal drugs and the homeless.

When a food service worker is diagnosed with hepatitis A, he or she is immediately excluded from work and not allowed to return without release from his or her medical provider.  Additionally, all employees at the establishment are vaccinated and disinfection and sanitation practices are followed. This White Castle scored 95-A and 100-A and on its last two health inspections.

Symptoms of hepatitis A are fatigue, decreased appetite, stomach pain, nausea, darkened urine, pale stools and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). People can become ill 15 to 50 days after being exposed to the virus. Anyone experiencing symptoms should seek medical attention.

Hepatitis A is usually transmitted by putting something in your mouth such as an object, food or drink, which has been in contact with the feces of an infected person. In November, the Kentucky Department for Public Health declared a statewide hepatitis A outbreak and has recommended that all residents be vaccinated.  Since the outbreak began there have been 457 cases diagnosed in Louisville and more than 75,000 vaccinated.

“Food-borne transmission has not been a factor in this outbreak,” said Dr. Lori Caloia, medical director of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness.  “The virus continues to be transmitted person-to-person, primarily among those who use illegal drugs and the homeless.  We have had a small number of food workers diagnosed with hepatitis A and the restaurant industry throughout Louisville continues to get their workers immunized.  More than 5,800 local food service employees have been vaccinated against hepatitis A.”

Reduced-cost vaccinations continue to be available to restaurant workers.  Restaurant workers wishing to be vaccinated should contact their managers for details.

The best ways to prevent hepatitis A infection are to get vaccinated and to practice good handwashing. “Washing your hands thoroughly and often with warm water and soap, especially before preparing meals or eating, after using the bathroom or changing a diaper is a proven way to prevent the spread of diseases,” Dr. Caloia added.  “Hand sanitizer is not as effective as hand washing against hepatitis A.”

For more information about hepatitis A visit https://louisvilleky.gov/government/health-wellness/hepatitis  or call 211.

An employee of the Speedway located at 5400 Antle Dr. has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis A.

Only customers who ate prepared food products such as pizza, hot dogs, breakfast sandwiches at this Speedway from May 15, 2018 to May 31, 2018 may have been exposed to the hepatitis A virus.  Customers who purchased fuel or packaged goods are not at risk.

While the risk of contracting hepatitis A from eating at Speedway is low, the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness is issuing this advisory out of an abundance of caution.  The hepatitis A outbreak remains centered among the homeless and those who use illegal drugs.

When a food service worker is diagnosed with hepatitis A, he or she is immediately excluded from work and not allowed to return without release from his or her medical provider.  Additionally, all employees at the establishment are vaccinated and disinfection and sanitation practices are followed. This Speedway’s last two food service inspection scores were 98-A and 100-A.

Symptoms of hepatitis A are fatigue, decreased appetite, stomach pain, nausea, darkened urine, pale stools and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). People can become ill 15 to 50 days after being exposed to the virus. Anyone experiencing symptoms should seek medical attention.

Hepatitis A is usually transmitted by putting something in your mouth such as an object, food or drink, which has been in contact with the feces of an infected person. In November, the Kentucky Department for Public Health declared a statewide hepatitis A outbreak and has recommended that all residents be vaccinated.  Since the outbreak began there have been 446 cases diagnosed in Louisville and almost 73,000 vaccinated. Of those, more than 5,700 are food workers.

“Food-borne transmission has not been a factor in this outbreak,” said Dr. Lori Caloia, medical director of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness.  “The virus continues to be transmitted person-to-person, primarily among those who use illegal drugs and the homeless.  We have had a very small number of food workers diagnosed with hepatitis A. We continue to encourage the restaurant industry to get their workers immunized.”

Reduced-cost vaccinations continue to be available to restaurant workers.  Restaurant workers wishing to be vaccinated should contact their managers for details.

The best ways to prevent hepatitis A infection are to get vaccinated and to practice good handwashing. “Washing your hands thoroughly and often with warm water and soap, especially before preparing meals or eating, after using the bathroom or changing a diaper is a proven way to prevent the spread of diseases,” Dr. Caloia added.  “Hand sanitizer is not as effective as hand washing against hepatitis A.”

For more information about hepatitis A visit https://louisvilleky.gov/government/health-wellness/hepatitis  or call 211.

Photo: Louisville Metro Office of Resilience and Community Service

Thanks to the generosity of local businesses, community organizations, and residents, hundreds of electric fans have been collected to provide heat relief for seniors and people with disabilities.  A “Fan Fair” giveaway and resource event is scheduled for Saturday, June 16 from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. at the Edison Center, 701 W. Ormsby Ave., Louisville, KY 40203.

Fans will be available for seniors 60 and older, as well as for individuals with documented disabilities, on a first-come, first-served basis.

Fan Fair qualifications and guidelines are as follows:

  • Person 60 years or older
  • Or documentation verified by a physician of a disability
  • Resident of Jefferson, Oldham, Henry, Shelby, Spencer, Trimble or Bullitt Counties
  • Proof of address and age
  • ​One fan per household

A Resource Fair will coincide with the fan giveaway event to provide basic health checks and information from local resources. Participating vendors include Aetna, AARP, JenCare, Kentuckiana Regional Planning & Development Agency (KIPDA), National Kidney Foundation, Louisville Metro Office of Resilience and Community Services, Senior Medicare Patrol and several other Metro Government divisions.

The Kentucky Attorney General’s Office of Senior Protection will also be educating and distributing prescription drug disposal kits to properly and safely dispose of unwanted or expired prescription drugs in the home.

Staff with Louisville Asset Building Coalition’s VITA (the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program) will provide resources, answer questions and set up appointments for individuals needing assistance with past due and amended tax returns.

Fan Fair is sponsored by KIPDA Area Agency on Aging and Independent Living and Louisville Metro Office for Aging & Disabled Citizens (OADC).  These organizations joined forces in 2016 to implement a fan drive and for the first annual Fan Fair in response to the numerous calls they received requesting heat relief.

This year’s fan collection will end June 13. Drop-off donations of new box fans can be made Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. at one of the following: KIPDA, 11520 Commonwealth Drive (Lou., KY 40299) or WLKY Studio, 1918 Mellwood Ave. (Lou, KY 40206).  Monetary donations are also appreciated to purchase fans and checks can be made payable to KIPDA, Attn:  Fan Fair, mailed to the address above on Commonwealth Drive, and postmarked by June 8.

To date, more than 250 fans have been donated, and more than $3500 in monetary donations have been received to purchase additional fans.  Some of the many donors include:

  • AARP
  • Aetna
  • CareSource
  • JenCare
  • Lowe’s
  • WLKY
  • Numerous individual donors
  • Local churches

WLKY served as the media partner providing both on-air and on-line advertising to promote the fan collection and serving as one of the donation drop-off sites.  Lowe’s provided multiple levels of support including donating more than 200 fans and allowing the purchase of additional fans at cost from the monetary donations that were collected.

“The amazing generosity we’ve received again this year is evidence of the compassion and desire to take care of one’s neighbor that exists in the Louisville community,” stated Sarah Teeters, Coordinator for OADC, part of the Office of Resilience and Community Services. “We hope to offer Fan Fair every summer as long as the need and the interest continue.”

“The increased support from the business community this year has been astonishing! It shows just how much dedication our city’s professionals have towards increasing the overall health of our community,” stated Jennifer Craig, Aging and Disability Resource Specialist for KIPDA.

For more information about the Fan Fair event, visit https://louisvilleky.gov/government/resilience-and-community-services  or  www.KIPDA.org.

Mayor Greg Fischer was presented a Health Leadership Award yesterday at the opening dinner of the US Conference of Mayors 86th annual meeting in Boston. The award was presented by CityHealth, an initiative of the de Beaumont Foundation and Kaiser Permanente, that regularly evaluates the nation’s 40 largest cities on the number and strength of their policies that help people live longer, better lives.

Louisville was one of only nine cities recognized for health leadership at the event.

In its annual health rankings released May 22, CityHealth awarded Louisville a bronze medal overall, meaning the city has a bronze, silver or gold medal in four of the nine CityHealth policies: affordable housing, alcohol sales control, complete streets, earned sick leave, food safety/restaurant grading, healthy food procurement, high-quality universal pre-kindergarten, smoke-free indoor air, and having a minimum legal age of 21 for purchase of tobacco products.

Louisville is one of only five cities nationwide that increased its overall medal status in 2018.

Over the past year Louisville strengthened its smoke-free indoor air ordinance by prohibiting the smoking or vaping electronic cigarettes as well as hookah. The city was also recognized for instituting a healthy vending policy, as well as a restaurant grading system that requires food establishments to post their food inspection grade where customers can see it.

“This award affirms the work my administration has been focused on since day 1: that we become a healthier city,” Mayor Fischer said. “We know that policy has a tremendous impact on how healthy the people of our city can be. That’s why we adopted a health in all policies approach to all that we do. It’s great to see our efforts having positive results, and we will continue working toward that overall goal of creating a culture of health.”

An employee of Denny’s restaurant at 4030 Dutchman’s Lane in St. Matthews has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis A.   Another employee at the same restaurant was diagnosed with acute hepatitis A in March.  The two cases are not related.

Customers who ate at this Denny’s from May 4, 2018 to May 24, 2018 may have been exposed to the hepatitis A virus.  While the risk of contracting hepatitis A from eating at this restaurant is low, the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness is issuing this advisory out of an abundance of caution.  The hepatitis A outbreak remains centered among the homeless and those who use illegal drugs.

When a food service worker is diagnosed with hepatitis A, he or she is immediately excluded from work and not allowed to return without release from his or her medical provider.  Additionally, all employees at the establishment are vaccinated and disinfection and sanitation practices are followed. The St. Matthews Denny’s scored 93-A and 94-A on its last two health inspections.

Symptoms of hepatitis A are fatigue, decreased appetite, stomach pain, nausea, darkened urine, pale stools and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). People can become ill 15 to 50 days after being exposed to the virus. Anyone experiencing symptoms should seek medical attention.

Hepatitis A is usually transmitted by putting something in your mouth such as an object, food or drink, which has been in contact with the feces of an infected person. In November, the Kentucky Department for Public Health declared a statewide hepatitis A outbreak and has recommended that all residents be vaccinated.  Since the outbreak began there have been 413 cases diagnosed in Louisville and more than 66,500 vaccinated.

“Food-borne transmission has not been a factor in this outbreak,” said Dr. Lori Caloia, medical director of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness.  “The virus continues to be transmitted person-to-person, primarily among those who use illegal drugs and the homeless.  We have had a very small number of food workers diagnosed with hepatitis A and the restaurant industry throughout Louisville continues to get their workers immunized.  More than 5,700 local food service employees have been vaccinated against hepatitis A.”

Reduced-cost vaccinations continue to be available to restaurant workers.  Restaurant workers wishing to be vaccinated should contact their managers for details.

The best ways to prevent hepatitis A infection are to get vaccinated and to practice good handwashing. “Washing your hands thoroughly and often with warm water and soap, especially before preparing meals or eating, after using the bathroom or changing a diaper is a proven way to prevent the spread of diseases,” Dr. Caloia added.  “Hand sanitizer is not as effective as hand washing against hepatitis A.”

For more information about hepatitis A visit https://louisvilleky.gov/government/health-wellness/hepatitis  or call 211.

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