Wednesday October 18, 2017
News Topics

A community design workshop will be held on Tuesday, October 17 at 6 p.m. at the Gheens Lodge at the Parklands of Floyds Fork to gather public input for the South Floyds Fork Vision, an ongoing process to create a visionary plan that will provide guidance for authentic, healthy, equitable, sustainable, and well-connected growth in the South Floyds Fork area.

The 4,000 acre Parklands of Floyds Fork is a transcendent asset for Louisville that includes four major parks linked by a park drive, an urban trail system, and watershed. The Parklands is expected to spur development and increase population in the area. The South Floyds Fork Vision will serve as a guide for future development and infrastructure investment in the study area.

The study area is bounded by Bardstown Road and Shelbyville Road to the north and south and the Gene Snyder Expressway and the county line to the west and east.

The South Floyds Fork Vision will be led by a team of representatives from Develop Louisville, Metro Council District 20, and local and national consultants, in coordination with representatives of the Parklands of Floyds Fork and Metro agencies. An advisory group, consisting of Senator Julie Raque Adams along with District 20 residents and stakeholders, has been formed to guide the process. Advisory Group members were recommended by Councilman Stuart Benson and appointed by Mayor Greg Fischer.

“The South Floyds Fork Area Vision is a project that will shape the future character of a large portion of District 20 surrounding the Parklands,” District 20 Councilman Stuart Benson said. “Please plan on joining us on October 17 to make your concerns and opinions heard.”

Once the Advisory Group has completed its work, the South Floyds Fork Vision will be forwarded to the Planning Commission and Metro Council for review and adoption. It is anticipated that adoption will occur in summer 2018.

For more information, visit https://www.floydsforkvision.com or https://louisvilleky.gov/government/advanced-planning/south-floyds-fork-area-study

Registration deadline is Oct. 22

A Nov. 2 economic development forum focused on west Louisville will examine strategies and available resources to help rebuild and sustain communities.

The University of Louisville’s College of Arts and Sciences is offering the public event, “The Future of Our Community: West Louisville Economic and Community Development Forum,” at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd. The program runs from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Advance registration is required by Oct. 22 for the forum, which includes lunch. Participants should visit http://uofl.me/wledf-2017 and pay online or by check; fees are $60 for corporate representatives, $50 for individuals and $40 for students.

Forum breakout sessions will focus on creative financing for individual and large construction projects, economic opportunities for minority-owned firms, successful neighborhood planning and access to lending opportunities. Panelists will include residents, developers, financiers, entrepreneurs and government and community group representatives.

WAVE 3 News anchor Dawne Gee will serve as mistress of ceremonies for the event.

The program includes a 12:45-2:15 p.m. luncheon panel with former National Basketball Association players Derek Anderson and Darrell Griffith discussing “Giving Back: The Power of Investing in the Community” and a tribute to philanthropist and civic leader Charlie Johnson.

The A&S international, diversity and engagement programs office organized the forum. Other partners are Brown-Forman Corp., OneWest, PNC Bank, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis-Louisville Branch, Louisville Metro Council, Louisville Housing Authority, Louisville Forward, U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth and UofL’s urban and public affairs department.

For a full schedule of sessions and speakers, see the forum’s website. For more information, contact Clest Lanier at 502-852-3042 or cvlani01@louisville.edu.

EnterpriseCorp, the entrepreneurial support arm of GLI, welcomed nearly 300 people to the Kentucky Derby Museum for the annual Evening of Entrepreneurship, presented by Wyatt Tarrant & Combs, Wednesday evening. The event featured a keynote presentation by Frederique Dame, a well-known angel investor and former product engineer for Uber, and gave the region’s startup community a chance to celebrate their accomplishments and look ahead to the work that needs to be done to accelerate the region’s startup community.

“We’ve taken huge steps forward in just a year’s time and as other communities have taught us, once the ball is rolling it’s hard to stop it. We have every reason to be optimistic about the state of entrepreneurship in our region. Yes, there are challenges that we need to take head on to keep up the pace of this progress, but there is so much to be proud of and so many opportunities to connect, engage and grow our region’s startups,” Lisa Bajorinas, Vice President of Entrepreneurship and Talent for GLI, told the crowd during her State of Entrepreneurship address.

The theme of this year’s program was customer development, specifically the clients that have made the biggest impact on local startups and entrepreneurs. Dame’s speech centered on her time at Uber and how the company scaled from early stage to global success by listening to their drivers and customers pain points and working from that point.

“Building a product with the customer is not only essential. It’s also really fun,” Dame said. “If you’re not building for the customer, then what is your business actually doing?”

Dame also took the chance to comment on the landscape of tech startups and how established companies and entrepreneurs can work together.

“Being beta testers, as a large customer, would be incredible help to small startups and the large companies can benefit from the collaboration with startups to increase their agility within their markets,” Dame said.

In addition to Dame’s address, Mary Tapolsky took home 2017’s EnterpriseCorp Award, which recognizes an individual that has made a significant contribution to Louisville’s entrepreneurial community.

Tapolsky is the Director for Technology Commercialization and Program Administration for UofL’s Nucleus. She focuses on developing and administering programs and services to help facilitate the creation and success of startup and early stage companies. These programs include LaunchIt, an entrepreneur training program that has graduated over 380 entrepreneurs, RevIt – Accelerating Customer Growth, VetStart, Open Office Hours, e + i Entrepreneurs Meet Innovators, Nucleus MeetUps, and Startup Seminar Series – Educating Entrepreneurs. In addition, she administers the Nucleus Startup Grants program and has been instrumental in recruiting more than twenty technology-based companies to One Innovation Center.

Joining with other cities and organizations across the country, Mayor Greg Fischer has proclaimed October 5 as Energy Efficiency Day to bring attention to the benefits of being energy efficient including utility bill cost savings, support of a thriving clean energy sector, reduction of emissions and improvement of air quality. Saving energy means saving money.

“Upgrades in energy efficiency in the workplace, the home or commercial business reduces energy bills and improves environmental health,” Fischer said. “The city continues to take steps to increase energy efficiency in its buildings so that less money is needed to operate our buildings and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. I encourage property owners across the city to consider implementing energy efficiency measures.”

Energy efficiency speaks directly to the Mayor’s sustainability goals to decrease energy use citywide per capita and in city-owned buildings.

Since 2013, the city has conducted significant energy efficiency improvements including lighting and HVAC upgrades, solar panels, and building management system controls, in more than 200 city operated buildings. In 2016, these energy efficiency improvements reduced an amount of carbon emissions equivalent to planting 45,963 trees and removing 3,034 cars from the road.

The city also partners with the Louisville Energy Alliance to promote ENERGY STAR certification for non-residential buildings and launched a cool roof rebate program that can reduce energy costs by up to 10% for the property owner.

Other cities that are joining in Energy Efficiency Day include Chicago, Denver, Memphis, New Orleans, Knoxville, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh.

If you want like to invest in energy saving methods in your home, workplace or commercial business, please contact the Office of Sustainability at 574-6285 or sustainability@louisvilleky.gov.

To view who else is joining in Energy Efficiency Day, visit https://energyefficiencyday.org/

The Kentucky State Council for the Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3) met Sept. 29 to renew its mission of supporting military families who transition between school systems.

“When a member of our armed forces is transferred to Kentucky, I want them to find this state and its school systems waiting with open arms,” said Gov. Bevin. “As Kentuckians and Americans, we should find ways to intentionally express our gratitude to these brave men and women. I am thankful to see this commission at work in Kentucky, and look forward to seeing how it will help honor those who put their lives on the line to defend and secure our liberty.”

Military families move between postings on a regular basis. While reassignments are often beneficial to a service member’s career, they can also add stress to military families, especially children. Issues facing these children include: Losing and making new friends, adjusting to new cities and bases, fitting in with new extracurricular/sporting teams and changing schools. The armed services and Kentucky have made great efforts to ease the transition of personnel, spouses and children.

“Kentucky’s MIC3 council has set an example of excellence on multiple occasions with how well it responded to the needs of our military families, and I’m looking forward to the impact we will continue to make,” said Col. (Ret.) M. Blaine Hedges, commissioner for the Kentucky MIC3 council. “We have a solid group of professionals, including legislators, local officials, Department of Defense leadership and the Kentucky Department of Education, and we are working toward a shared vision.”

The average military student faces transition challenges more than twice during high school, and most military children will attend between six and nine different school systems in their lives from kindergarten to 12th grade. More than half of all military personnel have dependents, and the impacts of reassignment and long deployments are key considerations when making long-term life choices.

“One of the critical aspects of a state’s membership in MIC3 is its obligation to ensure they hold State Council meetings on a regular basis. This provides the opportunity to plan strategies, and provide a forum to share stories and best practices,” said Cherise Imai, National Executive Director of the MIC3. “It is a testament to Kentucky and the other states engaging their councils that shows the importance they all place on these meetings. We salute military members that sacrifice so much for this country but remain focused on those left behind, the military children.”

The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children was developed by the Council of State Governments’ National Center for Interstate Compacts, the U.S. Department of Defense, national associations, federal and state officials, state departments of education, school administrators and military families. The MIC3 is a governmental entity operating under the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children. All 50 states and the District of Columbia are members of the compact, which ensures the uniform treatment of military children transferring between states and public school districts.

For more information about the Kentucky council, visit https://education.ky.gov/educational/Pages/Support-Our-Military-Families-in-School-Transitions.aspx.

In accordance with the proclamation by United States President Donald Trump, and with respect for those who lost their lives in the Las Vegas massacre, Governor Matt Bevin has directed both American and state flags at all state office buildings be lowered to half-staff beginning immediately until sunset on Oct. 6 to honor the victims and their families.

“What happened in Las Vegas was the handiwork of unadulterated evil in its vilest, most despicable form,” said Gov. Bevin. “Kentucky stands in solidarity with the citizens of Las Vegas and with all Americans in defiance of any act of terrorism against the citizens of our country. Today, and in the days to come, we will give thanks for the quick, decisive acts of first responders that prevented further tragedy. We mourn the lives that were lost, and we will honor their memory. We will pray for the families and friends of those who lost loved ones, and for those recovering from injuries sustained as the tragedy unfolded. We will not allow fear to rule our hearts—evil will not triumph against us. United we stand. Divided we fall.”

Gov. Bevin encourages individuals, businesses, organizations and government agencies to join in this tribute of lowering the flag to honor the victims and families of the Las Vegas shooting.

Photo: Kentucky Department Fish and Wildlife

Viewers of “Kentucky Afield” television picked up their phones and took to social media last weekend to submit more than 200 questions for the annual fall hunting call-in show.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources wildlife biologists Gabe Jenkins and John Morgan, along with Sgt. Rufus Cravens of the department’s Law Enforcement Division, joined “Kentucky Afield” host Chad Miles for the hour-long show that aired live on Sept. 16 on Kentucky Educational Television. The panel could not get to all of the questions before the credits started rolling.

Below, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife personnel answered a handful of the questions that did not make it on-air. Viewers who missed the live show can watch a full replay on YouTube. Enter “KYAfield” in the search box on the YouTube homepage.

Will Kentucky Fish and Wildlife consider adjusting deer seasons due to the EHD (Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease) outbreak? – Eddie from Morgan County

GABE JENKINS, Deer and Elk Program Coordinator, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife: We will not be implementing an emergency regulation to shorten or close deer season in 2017 in any county due to the EHD outbreak. We encourage folks to report all dead deer they find using our online reporting system.

After the outbreak has ceased, we will evaluate the number reported along with the harvest data from the 2017 season and make our recommendations for the 2018 season at the December meeting of the Fish and Wildlife Commission. Deer are prolific breeders, and the population will rebound within a couple years.

Lastly, if your area has experienced a severe die-off, I would encourage hunters to participate in some self-restraint and pass once you have taken enough deer to fill your freezer for the year.

How far west have elk traveled in Kentucky? – Wayne from Marion County

JENKINS: We receive reports of elk outside the elk zone almost every year. In the early years of elk restoration, we saw elk leave the elk zone more frequently. We’ve had reports of elk as far west as Lake Cumberland and one elk went to North Carolina. We have had elk harvested outside the elk zone in Bath, Carter, Laurel, Madison, Wayne and Wolfe counties.

What resources are available through Kentucky Fish and Wildlife to assist with wildlife habitat improvement? – Gary from Grayson

BEN ROBINSON, Wildlife Division Assistant Director, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife: Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is committed to assisting landowners with wildlife habitat improvement on their property. We employ more than 30 wildlife biologists who specialize in assisting private landowners with habitat management projects. From tips about improving food sources for deer and turkey to navigating cost share programs through the federal Farm Bill, we have someone available to assist you.

For more information, visit our web site at fw.ky.gov or call 1-800-858-1549 and ask for the phone number of your local private lands or farm bill biologist.

Does prescribed burning on private and public lands benefit wild turkeys? Where can I find more information? – Tony from Montgomery County

ROBINSON: Kentucky Fish and Wildlife considers prescribed fire an essential management tool for private landowners and publicly managed Wildlife Management Areas. Prescribed fires are carefully planned and managed by highly trained burn crews for containment to select areas.

We regularly use prescribed burning on grasslands and timbered areas to benefit a host of game and non-game species, including wild turkey.

Prescribed fire has many benefits. Fire removes old vegetation and stimulates new growth, providing a lush food source for wildlife. Fire promotes oak regeneration in our forests resulting in more acorns, a staple food source for many species. By removing dead vegetation, fire also creates bare ground, a necessity for bobwhite quail and other ground dwelling birds.

For more information on prescribed fire in Kentucky, visit the Kentucky Prescribed Fire Council’s website www.kyfire.org.

Why was bear season closed in McCreary County on public land? – David from McCreary County

JOHN HAST, Bear Program Coordinator, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife: Bear numbers are still low in McCreary County. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s philosophy on bear management is to allow as much hunter opportunity as the bear population will allow. What we may sacrifice in hunter opportunity in McCreary County for a few years will pay off when bears have a chance to grow within the county and expand more fully into surrounding counties, such and Pulaski and Rockcastle.

Great bear habitat lies just to the north of McCreary County within the Daniel Boone National Forest and it has the potential to provide a great place for bears and bear hunters in the future.

A population of bears is very slow in its growth and patience is necessary to see any big leaps in the season quota. You can rest assured that Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is actively monitoring bears in McCreary County in order to improve our population models. When the bear population is ready, hunters will once again be able to hunt public land.

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