Friday March 22, 2019
News Sections
Photo: Louisville Metro Council

Councilman Brandon Coan (D-8) is encouraging property and business owners along Bardstown Road, Baxter Avenue and the Douglass Loop to attend the next public meeting for the proposed creation of the Highlands Management District on Tuesday, February 12th at HopCat,1064 Bardstown Road beginning at 1:00pm.

“Since the first public meeting in 2018, we have been working to contact each and every property owner in the proposed service area to educate them about our plan,” said Coan. “This meeting is part of a homestretch effort to secure the commitments we need to move forward.”

The Councilman is proposing the creation of the Highlands Management District, a nongovernmental safety and cleanliness workforce, along the Bardstown Road/Baxter Avenue business corridor.

Management districts are funded by special assessments against properties located within service area boundaries, and they are managed by a voting board comprised of district property owners. The proposed Highlands Management District special assessment is $0.1745 per $100 PVA.

Coan’s proposal is the result of months of studies, reports and recommendations by an exploratory committee comprised of property owners and other stakeholders in the corridor, in consultation with the Louisville Downtown Partnership.

For more information about the proposed Highlands Management District, contact Councilman Coan’s office at 574-1108 or visit www.tinyurl.com/BardstownRdBID for more information.

Historic Locust Grove, a National Historic Landmark established c. 1792, is planning a year of programming centering on The Age of Hamilton, the period of time from c. 1770- 1805 that encompasses the American Revolution and the early years of American independence.

Keyed to the arrival in June 2019 of Hamilton: An American Musical, at the Kentucky Center for the Arts, Locust Grove will look at the personalities and events of the era of the American Revolution through the Early National period in depth. Washington, Jefferson, Burr, and Hamilton all were part of the world of William Croghan and George Rogers Clark.

The story of Locust Grove finds its roots in the American Revolution, through the military service of Major William Croghan, who established and lived at Locust Grove from 1792-1822, and his brother-in-law, General George Rogers Clark, who founded Louisville in 1778 and led the Illinois Campaign that brought the western territories under the control of American forces at the same time George Washington commanded the Continental Army in the east. Croghan fought with the Continental Army and was a participant in the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, and Germantown. He wintered with Continental forces at Valley Forge and witnessed the British surrender at Yorktown in 1781. Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, the Marquis de Lafayette were all part of the world of both Croghan and Clark.

“The experiences of the people of the Revolutionary era presented in Hamilton are mirrored in the stories of the people of Locust Grove and early Louisville,” says Carol Ely, Executive Director of Locust Grove.  “It’s exciting to have the chance to explore the personalities and ideas of the era in fresh new ways.”

Locust Grove kicks off The Age of Hamilton this month with A Winter’s Ball, just in time for Valentine’s Day. This historical ball will be held on Saturday, February 9 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm, and will feature live music and period dancing. Co-sponsored by The Jane Austen Society of North America—Greater Louisville Region, guests will be asked to wear historical dress from their favorite time period as we capture the atmosphere of the ball where Alexander Hamilton met his bride, Eliza Schuyler in 1780. 

Guests should look for a trio of Punch with the President evenings in March, April and May focusing on the lives and libations of presidents George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson.  Led by visiting historians, including Dr. Matthew Costello of The White House Historical Association, Gwynne Tuell Potts, and historical interpreter Peyton Dixon, these evening programs find connections between the first three presidents, early American history, and Locust Grove, along with period drinks. Locust Grove’s Afternoon Lecture Series, held on the first Wednesday of each month, will focus on revolutionary topics such as African Americans in the Revolution and dueling in Early Kentucky. A subsequent program on June 6, Hamilton: How the Musical Remixes American History, presented by Dr. Richard Bell, will explore the historical origins of the blockbuster musical.

This season of programming at Locust Grove also engages the site’s educational mission, with a professional development opportunity for teachers on February 16, and a student competition where students will perform using historical documents as their inspiration. Thanks to the generosity of the Louisville Theatrical Association/PNC Broadway in Louisville, participants in these programs will have the opportunity to win tickets to see Hamilton when it arrives in Louisville. Members of the public will also have the chance to win tickets for the show.

Finally, Locust Grove’s Age of Hamilton will culminate with The Hamilton Festival on June 16, 2019.  This celebration of the Revolution will feature student performances of original pieces, a re-creation of the Hamilton-Burr Duel, a sing-a-long, and presentation on clothing of the period, Aaron Burr’s time in Louisville, and more.

According to Brian Cushing, Locust Grove’s program director, “The site has explored a lot of exciting directions over the years but the contributions to the United States of America by the Revolutionary War veterans connected with Locust Grove, especially George Rogers Clark, remains the cornerstone of our story.  Now that Hamilton is shining a spotlight on that era, we’re able to draw our visitors, into the core of our mission of the exploration of history.”

A full calendar of The Age of Hamilton events and more information can be found at www.locustgrove.org/revolution.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) recently awarded a contract for rehabilitation of the Bernheim Bridge in Cherokee Park in Louisville. This bridge, also known as Bridge No. 8, crosses the Middle Fork of Beargrass Creek.

This project includes waterproofing and repairing the concrete arch, resetting the railings, masonry repairs on the spandrel walls and railings and new asphalt pavement on the crossing.

KYTC is coordinating the bridge repairs with Louisville Parks and Recreation and Olmsted Parks Conservancy.

Construction is scheduled to begin this week. The bridge crossing via Beargrass Road from Park Boundary Road and Alta Vista Road will be inaccessible through the duration of the project. The Bernheim Bridge will reopen to traffic in late summer.

Several popular nearby park features, including Big Rock pavilion, parking and playground area, will be easily accessible during the construction period. A detour map can be viewed below.

Louisville Paving Company was awarded the $1.1 million construction contract. Marr Construction will be the subcontractor for the masonry rehabilitation of the historic bridge. Marr has worked on several other bridge restoration projects in Cherokee Park.

The Bernheim Bridge dates to 1928 and was named for Bernhard and Rosa Bernheim, who were members of the notable Bernheim family that includes Isaac Wolfe Bernheim, who founded the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest south of Louisville.

Another bridge in Cherokee Park on the Scenic Loop is scheduled for repairs later this year. These bridges are part of KYTC’s Bridging Kentucky program. Bridging Kentucky includes more than 1,000 state, county, and municipal structures that are rated in poor condition or have restricted weight limits. More than 70 of the bridges on the list are currently closed to traffic.

Each bridge will be addressed in the next six years, either replaced with a new structure designed to last at least 75 years or rehabilitated to extend its life by at least 30 years. Those with restricted weight limits will reopen to school buses, emergency vehicles, commercial trucks, as well as passenger vehicles.

The date and duration of this work may be adjusted if inclement weather or other unforeseen delays occur. Visit goky.ky.gov for the latest in traffic and travel information in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Traffic information for the District 5 counties is also available at facebook.com/KYTCDistrict5 and twitter.com/KYTCDistrict5.

Prompted by concerns over temporary housing in residential areas, President David James (D-6) is calling for a review of the Land Development Code to see if additional standards need to be considered for approval.

Photo: Louisville Metro Council

          “There have been several instances where temporary housing has created issues dealing with nuisances and many are questioning the compatibility of some forms of this type of usage in residential areas and neighborhoods,” said James.

          The President announced the filing of the Resolution during a news conference on Monday where he was joined by the members of the Recovery Housing Task Force.

          “The Recovery Housing Task Force is a group of concerned citizens who meet with the Department of Public Health and Wellness. We took our concerns to President James. Transitional housing recovery housing boarding housing etc. has been a problem that has plagued our community for years,” Kimberly Moore of the Task Force. “We are here today because we want to address the problem. There have been numerous complaints from concerned citizens regarding issues within their community and there is ongoing predatory behavior.”

          The Resolution defines the many forms of temporary housing as: Transitional Housing, Boarding and Lodging Houses, Homeless Shelters, Rehabilitation Houses and Residential Care Facilities (collectively referred to as “Temporary Housing”).

          Several forms of temporary housing are allowed as conditional uses or as permitted use with special standards within certain designated zoning districts.

          The President said the Resolution asks Louisville Metro Planning and Design Services to review the Land Development Code regarding temporary housing in residential zoning districts to consider adoption of additional standards to improve the compatibility of these uses within residential areas. It asks for recommendations that will aid in the enforcement of the regulations to ensure compliance. 

          “I think this kind of review is long overdue considering the various types of temporary housing we have seen over the last several years,” says James. “I am seeking the support of my colleagues to move this forward.”     

          “We are not here today to put anyone out of business or displace individuals, but we are here to tell you that if you are not willing to treat people with respect, compassion and dignity we do NOT want you operating in Metro Louisville,” said Moore. “There will be actions taken if you are operating without proper permits. We are grateful that the County Attorney’s office have become willing to address this problem with us. We look forward to finding solutions to this problem.”

          The Resolution will be assigned to the Metro Council’s Planning and Zoning Committee.

Here is a link to the proposed Resolution:

https://louisvilleky.gov/sites/default/files/metro_council/members/6/pdf…

Councilwoman Donna Purvis reminds residents that the new District 5 satellite office will officially open tomorrow, Tuesday February 5th.

Photo: Louisville Metro Council

 “I am looking forward to hearing from the people of District 5 with any issues or concerns they may have with Metro Government,” says the Councilwoman.

The District 5 Satellite Office is located in the Kroger at 520 North 35th Street. Hours will be from 9:00am to 12:00pm on the 5th and 19th of each month. Councilwoman Purvis will be there personally to address concerns and meet constituents.

“This is a very informal setting and anyone who feels they need to talk with me on anything should stop by or just come by to say hello. It is important that I know what’s on your mind,” says Purvis.

For more information, Contact Councilwoman Purvis’ Office at 574-1105.

Reports Of Flu Cases Rises

719 new cases of flu were reported last week (Jan. 27 – Feb 2). That’s a new high for this flu season.  The predominant strain continues to be type A which is covered in this year’s flu vaccine.  You can see more more detail on flu in Louisville by viewing our weekly influenza data briefs found HERE.

Learn more about the flu, the flu vaccine, what to do if you have the flu, and how to prevent the flue HERE.

Neighborhood Place partners provide several opportunities to benefit your health including a Healthy Living Club, an educational baby shower, a Freedom from Smoking Class and much more. To learn more about these offerings, please refer to the list below.

Feb 4, 11 and 21, Passport Health Care Community Engagement at two locations
Passport members are invited to join representatives from Passport Health Care for one-on-one consultations to discuss plan benefits and options. This is a great opportunity as Passport aims to raise awareness and educate the community about the Passport Health Plan mission. Passport members will receive a $10 retail gift card for attending.

  • Feb. 4 and 11, at First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Rd (door #16) side of Thomas Jefferson Middle School, 1 – 3 p.m. Call (502) 212-6677 to leave a message telling us that you want to attend.
  • Feb 21 at South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, 1000 Neighborhood Place, Fairdale, 2 -3 p.m. Call 1-800-578-0603, ext. 8428 to sign up.

Feb. 7, The Center for Women and Families Outreach at First Neighborhood Place, 1- 5 p.m.
Located at 1503 Rangeland Rd (door #24) side of Thomas Jefferson Middle School. For more information, contact Nayelyi Sanchez, Domestic Violence Advocate at (502) 581-7270. Staff with the Center for Women and Families will be on-hand to give an overview of their services which include trauma-informed advocacy and support for qualified families and individuals with supportive services; emergency shelter; sexual assault services; housing; children’s services and more.

Feb 7, Sodexo Hiring Opportunities at First Neighborhood Place, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. 
Located at 1503 Rangeland Road (T.J. Middle School in the W.D. Bruce Building – door #24). Call 313-4700 for more information.  Sodexo, a food-service agency, will provide on-the-spot interviews for positions with Jewish Hospital, Our Lady of Peace and University of Louisville Hospital. Bring your resume and be prepared for an interview. This is one of Sodexo’s busiest hiring seasons. Stop by if you are looking for employment that can lead to a full-time or part-time position.

Feb. 12, Free Energy Management Workshops at First Neighborhood Place, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Located at 1503 Rangeland Rd. Call 313-4728 or 313-4700 for reservations. Project Warm’s free workshops help families take control of their energy usage and learn “do-it-yourself” energy-saving tips. Free supplies will be distributed at the end of the workshop such as clear plastic/tape for windows, caulk to seal openings around windows and sealing foam. Reservations needed to reserve materials

Feb. 12, 19 and 26, Healthy Living Club at South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, 1 – 2 p.m.
Located at 1000 Neighborhood Place. Call 363-1483 for more information. Classes are open to anyone interested in gaining more knowledge to live a better and more fulfilling life. This month’s workshops beginning Feb. 12th are focused on finances including these topics: “Banking”, “How to Use Credit”, “Scams You May Encounter”, and “Financial Abuse- Are You A Victim”. Guest Speakers are Joseph Cecil with Bank on Louisville and Sandra Pace with the U.S. Armed Forces.

Feb. 14 and 20, A Healthy Journey for Two Educational Baby Shower at two locations
For more information, contact Mendy Mason at 502-341-5400. A Healthy Journey for Two is an educational baby shower open to any expectant mothers. The class will include a range of information and resources, as well as free baby items, gift cards, prizes, and snacks. Hosted by Seven Counties and KIDSNow. Fathers are welcome but must be registered.

  • Feb. 14 at First Neighborhood Place, 1503 Rangeland Rd. 1 – 3 p.m.
  • Feb. 20 at Ujima Neighborhood Place, 3610 Bohne Ave., 1- 3 p.m.

Wednesdays, beginning Feb. 20, Freedom from Smoking Class at South Jefferson Neighborhood Place, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Located at 1000 Neighborhood Place. Call 772-8588 for more information or to sign up for the class. This seven-week program features a step-by-step plan for quitting smoking and each session is designed to help smokers gain control over the behavior. Participants are eligible to receive some free nicotine patches for attending the classes.

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