Saturday July 20, 2019
News Sections

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) recently awarded a contract for rehabilitation of the Bernheim Bridge in Cherokee Park in Louisville. This bridge, also known as Bridge No. 8, crosses the Middle Fork of Beargrass Creek.

This project includes waterproofing and repairing the concrete arch, resetting the railings, masonry repairs on the spandrel walls and railings and new asphalt pavement on the crossing.

KYTC is coordinating the bridge repairs with Louisville Parks and Recreation and Olmsted Parks Conservancy.

Construction is scheduled to begin this week. The bridge crossing via Beargrass Road from Park Boundary Road and Alta Vista Road will be inaccessible through the duration of the project. The Bernheim Bridge will reopen to traffic in late summer.

Several popular nearby park features, including Big Rock pavilion, parking and playground area, will be easily accessible during the construction period. A detour map can be viewed below.

Louisville Paving Company was awarded the $1.1 million construction contract. Marr Construction will be the subcontractor for the masonry rehabilitation of the historic bridge. Marr has worked on several other bridge restoration projects in Cherokee Park.

The Bernheim Bridge dates to 1928 and was named for Bernhard and Rosa Bernheim, who were members of the notable Bernheim family that includes Isaac Wolfe Bernheim, who founded the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest south of Louisville.

Another bridge in Cherokee Park on the Scenic Loop is scheduled for repairs later this year. These bridges are part of KYTC’s Bridging Kentucky program. Bridging Kentucky includes more than 1,000 state, county, and municipal structures that are rated in poor condition or have restricted weight limits. More than 70 of the bridges on the list are currently closed to traffic.

Each bridge will be addressed in the next six years, either replaced with a new structure designed to last at least 75 years or rehabilitated to extend its life by at least 30 years. Those with restricted weight limits will reopen to school buses, emergency vehicles, commercial trucks, as well as passenger vehicles.

The date and duration of this work may be adjusted if inclement weather or other unforeseen delays occur. Visit goky.ky.gov for the latest in traffic and travel information in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Traffic information for the District 5 counties is also available at facebook.com/KYTCDistrict5 and twitter.com/KYTCDistrict5.

January is proving to be a busy month at the Kentucky Exposition Center.  Admission varies by event, but parking is $10 per vehicle per event.

The year kicks off of with the end the Kentucky Flea Market New Year’s Spectacular.  The event starts on December 29th and includes free admission. As an added bonus, if you make a purchase at the Flea Market, parking will be half price.

Next up on the calendar is the National Wrestling Coaches Association Multi-Divisional Natioanl Duals. The two day event will feature the some of the best atheletes from Division II, III, NAIA, NJCAA and Women’s programs from across the country.  Tickets start at $17 for students and $25 for adults, plus parking at the Exposition center.

January 5th will be the Yugioh! Regional Qualifier. Entry fee is $20 (spectators are free) and includes 5 packs of soul fusion.  More information about tournament structure and format can be found online.

January 6th will be the Kentucky Bridal and Wedding Expo. Tickets are $10 at the door (or free if acquired online in advance).

January 10-12: Members of ATA can attend the Archery Trade Association show.

January 12 and 13: The Great Train Show is designed for anyone interested in model trains. The show will feature more than 40 exhibitors, model train displays, workshops, and a riding train for children. Children are free with an adult. Tickets are available online.

January 18-20: The Outdoor Life/Field and Stream Expo. This Expo was formerly named the Deer and Turkey Expo. Anyone interested in the outdoors, or hunting will find something here. The show will feature a trophy contest, seminars, archery and shooting ranges, and more.  Tickets can be purchased in advanced online at a discounted price.

January 19-20: National Gun Day JAG Military Gun Show.  More information to be announced as the event gets closer.

January 23-27: Louisville Boat, RV and Sport Show Children under 12 are free with adult. Tickets are available for purchase online.

January 25-27: USA BMX Bluegrass Nationals. Freedom Hall will become an indoor BMX racing track as athletes compete in the second of 13 events.  The event is open to the public.

January 26-27: The Crown Cheer & Dance Championship. This event will be held in the Broadbent Arena and admission is $15 per person (children 5 and younger are free with adult).

January 30-February 1: Midwest Manufacturing Housing Federation Show  This is not a public show and only people that are involved in the industry will be admitted.

The city of Louisville is privileged to host the USA Cyclocross National Championships at Joe Creason Park December 11-15. This international event, coming on the heels of last year’s Derby City Cup, will feature nearly 1,700 top professional and amateur riders competing over the course of the week from 45 states.

The competition will also draw thousands of spectators from the city of Louisville and beyond, and the event area will feature an expo area, food trucks, hospitality tents and other temporary amenities.

Louisville Parks and Recreation and the host organization, the Louisville Sports Commission, are aware of the stress such an event can put on the natural balance of a scenic park such as Creason.

We are taking the following steps to ensure a return to its idyllic state following the competition:

  • Turf areas throughout Creason: As soon as weather permits, if an area is heavily compacted, we’ll aerate, plant seed, winterize the soil, and place straw through the impacted areas. It’s the same approach we took following last year’s Derby City Cup, and the park sustained no lasting negative impacts. We expect full recovery of the areas by late spring.
  • The Creason managed meadows areas: they’ve been cut for the season as the growing period has ceased for the year. When the course was laid out, we avoided particularly sensitive areas. We will replace impacted areas with native grasses and perennial seeds and use straw on areas that have exposed soil. We will continually monitor the area and treat for invasives (i.e. Johnson Grass) and remove anything that’s not desirable.
  • Also in the managed meadows areas: the parks volunteer coordinator and parks supervision overseeing the restoration of the park will be leading a flower bulb planting project in the weeks following the race to add some spring color to the park.
  • The woodland areas surrounding the course – we’ve removed invasive species such as Porcelain Berry and Tree Of Heaven, and along the slopes are employing erosion control methods, straw and silt fencing to keep litter and any pollutants away from the waterways

Questions? E-mail parks@louisvilleky.gov.

The Louisville Orchestra will present Star Wars: A New Hope In Concert featuring screenings of the complete film with Oscar®-winning composer John Williams’ musical score performed live to the film. The concert will be led by acclaimed conductor Keitaro Harada at the Kentucky Center on Saturday, February 2 at 7:30PM and Sunday, February 3 at 3PM.

Tickets start at $35 and are available by calling 502.584.7777 or visiting LouisvilleOrchestra.org.

Set 30 years after Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, Star Wars: A New Hope, the fourth episode of the saga, starts on the desert planet of Tatooine. A young Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) begins to discover his destiny when, searching for a lost droid, he is saved by reclusive Jedi Obi-Wan Kenobi (Alec Guinness). A civil war rages in the galaxy, and Rebel forces struggle against the evil Galactic Empire, Luke and Obi-Wan enlist the aid of hotshot pilot, Han Solo (Harrison Ford). Joined by the quirky droid duo R2-D2 and C-3PO, the unlikely team sets out to rescue Rebel leader Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher) and make use of the stolen plans to destroy the Empire’s ultimate weapon.

In a legendary confrontation, the rogue group mounts an attack against the Death Star for a climactic battle with the evil Sith Lord Darth Vader. Since the release of the first Star Wars movie over 40 years ago, the Star Wars saga has had a seismic impact on both cinema and culture, inspiring audiences around the world with its mythic storytelling, captivating characters, groundbreaking special effects and iconic musical scores composed by John Williams. Legendary composer Williams is well known for scoring all eight of the Star Wars saga films to date, beginning with 1977’s Star Wars: A New Hope for which he earned an Academy Award® for Best Original Score. His scores for The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi, Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Star Wars: The Last Jedi, were each nominated for Best Original Score.

The Star Wars: Film Concert Series is produced under license by Disney Concerts in association with 20th Century Fox and Warner/Chappell Music. STAR WARS and related properties are trademarks and/or copyrights, in the United States and other countries, of Lucasfilm Ltd. and/or its affiliates. © & TM

To kick off the New Year, your Louisville Orchestra brings internationally acclaimed conductor, Leonard Slatkin to The Kentucky Center on Saturday, January 12 at 8PM. Mr. Slatkin will conduct the LO in Edward Elgar’s most famous works, Enigma Variations.

Single tickets start at $27* and are available by calling 502.584.7777 or by visiting LouisvilleOrchestra.org.

Cindy McTee, Mr. Slatkin’s wife, is an accomplished composer and her work, Double Play will open the concert followed by a piece by Leonard Slatkin himself, Kinah (Hebrew for “elegy” or “dirge”), which was written in memory of his parents. The program is rounded out by a rousing work for ballet, The Incredible Flutist by Walter Piston.

The Enigma Variations is the work that put Elgar on the musical map. He had made his living as a musical jack-of-all-trades, playing several instruments, conducting, teaching, and composing. His early works brought him scant recognition; it was not until he composed his Enigma Variations that he came into his own as a composer of quality; one whom Richard Strauss would call “the first English progressivist.”

As the title implies, the work is a theme-and-variations, but with a twist: the theme is never heard—hence the “enigma.” What’s more, each variation is also a portrait of one of his friends. Each was cryptically titled with a set of initials or a name, and it was not until after Elgar’s death that all of the identities became known.

The featured LO musician for this program is LO’s own incredible flutist, Kathy Karr who will talk with 90.5 WUOL’s Daniel Gilliam at the LO Concert Talk at 6:45PM prior to the concert.

The Muhammad Ali Center is proud to announce its upcoming Daughters of Greatness speaker, Doris Kearns Goodwin. Goodwin, a world-renowned presidential historian, public speaker and Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times #1 Best-Selling author, will speak at the Center on Friday, December 7th. The event will begin with a hot breakfast at 8:30 a.m. and the program will follow from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

Throughout the year, the Daughters of Greatness breakfast series invites prominent women engaged in social philanthropy, activism, and pursuits of justice to share their stories with the Louisville community. The Daughters of Greatness series provides a place for dialogue and discussion on current issues of justice, community engagement, and social movements within the Louisville area and beyond.

Ms. Goodwin will also appear at the Kentucky Author Forum on Thursday, December 6th at the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts at 6pm and will be interviewed by Scott Berg, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of five bestselling biographies.

Goodwin is known for her highly regarded studies of American presidents. Her career as a presidential historian and author was inspired when as a 24-year-old graduate student at Harvard she was selected to join the White House Fellows, one of America’s most prestigious programs for leadership and public service.

A meeting with Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967 resulted in Goodwin’s first book, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, which will be re-released in spring 2019. Her second book, The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, was a best-seller. Following the release of No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II, Goodwin published a memoir detailing her youth in Brooklyn. She returned to presidential literature thereafter, releasing Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln in 2005.  In 2013, she wrote the critically acclaimed and The New York Times bestselling The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism (November 2013).

In her seventh book, Leadership in Turbulent Times (published on September 18, 2018 by Simon & Schuster), is the culmination of her five-decade career of studying the American presidents. Goodwin draws upon four of the presidents she has studied most closely—Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)—to show how they first recognized leadership qualities within themselves, and were recognized by others as leaders.

Well known for her appearances and commentary on television, Goodwin is seen frequently on all the major television and cable networks and shows including Meet the Press and The Late Show with Colbert Report. Most recently she played herself as a teacher to Lisa Simpson on The Simpsons and a historian on American Horror Story.

Goodwin graduated magna cum laude from Colby College. She earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Government from Harvard University, where she taught Government, including a course on the American Presidency.

Among her many honors and awards, Goodwin was awarded the Charles Frankel Prize, given by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Sarah Josepha Hale Medal, the New England Book Award, as well as the Carl Sandburg Literary Award.

Goodwin lives in Concord, Massachusetts. She was the first woman to enter the Boston Red Sox locker room, and is a devoted fan of the World Series-winning team.

Seating is limited. Tickets are $20 for Ali Center members, $25 for non-members, $15 for students. Tables of 8 and 10 are also available.

Reservations must be made in advance by clicking here or by contacting Erin Herbert at eherbert@alicenter.org.

For more information or to purchase tickets for the Kentucky Author Forum, please visit https://kentuckyauthorforum.com/event/doris-kearns-goodwin/

The Little Elf That Could

By Charlotte Stephens

Before he became a bestselling author, David Sedaris survived by working odd jobs. He picked apples in Oregon. He reinforced the edges of window screens with a stapler (to keep squirrels from invading attics) in Chicago. He cleaned apartments in new York City. And, broke and jobless after first moving to the Big Apple, he got a gig playing an elf at Macy’s “SantaLand,” which would inspire his beloved and hilariously biting personal essay, “Santaland Diaries.”

Sedaris is now a literary celebrity. he’s one of the few writers who can fill Carnegie Hall with his adoring fans and who’s been considered funny enough to appear regularly on The Late Show with David Letterman. During his days as Crumpet the Elf, however, he never thought he’d see his dream of being a published author come true. “I’m wearing a green velvet costume; it doesn’t get any worse than this,” Sedaris-as-Crumpet quips darkly. But his career would profit immensely from this time spent faking holiday cheer and herding frazzled families for their photo with Santa. It was “Santaland Diaries” that introduced Sedaris’s signature deadpan humor to a national audience, catapulting him to fame in the early 1990s.

Since 1977, Sedaris had kept a diary, often carrying a notebook with him to record experiences both bizarre and mundane. (He’s known for his ability to highlight the weirdness of everyday life, zeroing in on personal quirks or strange encounters that are often highly relateable, but that we might never think to document in such comic detail.) As with many of his other early writings, the pithy observations in “Santaland Diaries” originally came from these journal entries. According to Sedaris, “‘Santaland’ was just stuff in my diary. All I did was take things from my diary and arrange them.”

One night, he was reading exceprts from his diary onstage at a small New York club. He later recounted in an NPR interview:

“[Radio host] Ira Glass was in the audience. He introduced himself…Later, he called, asking if I had anything Christmassy for a show that he was doing at the time called…So I recorded the Santa story for that, and he put it on [the daily NPR program] Morning Edition.”

Sedaris could never have predicted the rush of popularity that followed. “My life just changed completely,” he has said, “like someone waved a magic wand.”

The rest is history. Thanks to the wild success of “Santaland Diaries,” Sedaris, in his words, “went from having 50 listeners to 50 million listeners.” Soon after, he landed the book contract that led to his first published collection of essays and short fiction, the critically acclaimed Barrel Fever (in which “Santaland Diaries” also appears). Today, there are more than 10 million copies of Sedaris’s books in print, and his work has been translated into 25 languages. Meanwhile, his recording of “Santaland Diaries” has aired on Morning Edition during the Christmas season every year since 2004, and is one of the show’s most requested features. Not too shabby for a man who’d often joked that he was only qualified for “jobs that needed no skills.”

Tickets are available online here.

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