Saturday December 14, 2019
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An evaluation team will soon review 13 bids submitted during a Request For Proposals (RFP) process for the management, operation and maintenance of Louisville’s public golf courses, according to an update provided today to Louisville Metro Council President David James by Chief Financial Officer Daniel Frockt and Parks and Recreation Director Dana Kasler.

Mayor Greg Fischer announced earlier this year the city may be forced to make adjustments to the management, operation and maintenance of the 10 city golf courses as part of a series of cuts necessitated by the state of Kentucky’s pension crisis and a lack of new revenue sources.

On Sept. 13, 2019, the city issued a Request for Proposals (RFP), for management, operation, and maintenance of the courses.

The RFP process closed Oct. 22. The next step is for an evaluation team to review the proposals with a tentative completion date of Nov. 18, 2019. Following subsequent negotiations, the goal is to award a new contract(s) for operations by Dec. 31, 2019.

“We are taking great care to ensure a smooth process during this transition period,” Kasler said. “I am confident the review team will diligently explore the options found within these 13 proposals to help retain municipal golf in the city.”

Louisville Parks and Recreation golf courses are Metro-owned and currently managed independently by PGA professionals whose contracts are up at the end of 2019 – except for Quail Chase, where the contract expires December 31, 2024.

“This RFP process is designed to assist us in making the smartest and most fiscally responsible decisions for the taxpayers of this community,” Frockt said. “We also believe it will lead to more streamlined and improved golf course operations, which in this strained budget climate is critical.”

In the update to the Council president, Frockt and Kasler clarified that records related to the process will be kept confidential until a contract is awarded, under a process established per Kentucky state law to eliminate the potential of undue influence and impropriety on the evaluation team.

Also, no council members will serve on the evaluation upon the recommendation from the Jefferson County Attorney’s Office.

Frockt and Kasler also noted that Metro Government will continue to follow the union contract regarding Louisville Parks and Recreation golf course staff during this transition period. “Therefore,” they wrote, “no Metro Council member or body may bind Metro government into any manner of collective bargaining agreement, side letter revision, or memorandum of understanding (MOU).”

The letter also provided an update on course operations through the end of the year, when most lease agreements expire.

Because the PGA professionals at Shawnee, Crescent Hill and Charlie Vettiner have submitted their resignations, the letter said, Louisville Parks and Recreation, per ordinance, will staff those courses.

Beginning on January 1, 2020, course operations will fall under the new contracts awarded through the RFP process. Those courses not awarded a contract will be operated by Louisville Parks and Recreation.

The popular Tom Owen CycLOUvia returns to Bardstown Road on Sunday, Oct. 20. The popular event showcases alternative transit and is named in honor of former District 8 Councilman Tom Owen, a lifelong advocate for bicycles and pedestrians in our community.

The event route is shortened this year due to budget constraints. The road will be closed to vehicular traffic along Bardstown Road from Douglass Boulevard to Highland Avenue from 2 to 6 p.m. Police will facilitate motor crossings at Grinstead Drive and Eastern Parkway.

“This fun event brings people of all ages and backgrounds together to promote healthy habits, sustainable modes of transit, and safety,” said Mayor Greg Fischer. “CycLOUvia also gives residents the opportunity to celebrate the small businesses along a car-free Bardstown Road.”

Commercial establishments with frontage along the Bardstown Road corridor are encouraged to open their businesses during event hours and to engage participants.

During CycLOUvia, streets are opened to people of all ages, abilities, and socio-economic backgrounds looking to improve their mental, physical, and emotional health.

Since 2012, CycLOUvia events have attracted tens of thousands of people to neighborhoods across the city. CycLOUvia promotes healthy lifestyles, alternative transportation, safety, and economic development.

For more information, please visit https://louisvilleky.gov/government/advanced-planning/cyclouvia.

“Canoemobile” Back For 8th Year

Photo: Kentucky Department Fish and Wildlife

The Canoemobile is coming back to Shawnee and Riverview Parks on Oct. 4-5 for its eighth year on the banks of the Ohio River.

The Canoemobile allows residents ages three and older to take guided trips in 24-foot canoes on the Ohio River. Canoe trips are free. Participants under the age of 18 must have a waiver signed by a parent or legal guardian in order to participate. No advance sign-ups are required, wavers can be signed on-site or brought with the participants.

This free event is designed for individuals and families who are new to canoeing to experience the water in safe and stable voyageur canoes which hold 10 to 15 people.

All safety equipment and trained staff are provided. Wear comfortable outdoor clothing that can get wet; no flip flops please.

All safety equipment and trained staff are provided by Wilderness Inquiry.

Complimentary t-shirts will be given to those who participate, while supplies last. For more information, call (502) 368-6856.

 

Waivers for Participation:

SCHEDULE:

Friday, October 4, 2019
10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Shawnee Park
4501 West Broadway

Saturday, October 5, 2019
10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Riverview Park
8202 Greenwood Road

The Beechmont Community Center and Louisville City FC will be hosting the second annual Soccer Skills Clinic at the outdoor futsal court on Saturday, September 21 and Saturday, September 28.

Beechmont is located just off Southern Parkway at 205 W. Wellington Avenue, 40214. The clinic, which is targeted for boys and girls 5-13 years of age, is free of charge. The clinic will begin at 10 a.m. sharp and end at noon each day.

Jacob Hazel, an organizer of the clinic, says that while experienced players may find something to learn at Beechmont, the fun, interactive games put on by Louisville City FC reps are meant to appeal to beginners and intermediate players.

To register for the clinic, please call (502) 361-5484, e-mail Jacob.Hazel@louisvilleky.gov.

Mayor Greg Fischer joined Metro Council members, the Commission on Public Art, artist Todd C. Smith, and community partners at the base of the Big Four Bridge to unveil Bike Sense Louisville, a public art project that will promote healthy lifestyle habits and provide new data on the city’s air quality and temperature.

Using sensor units that fit into cyclists’ water bottle holders, data is collected about the cyclists’ speed and location, as well as the temperature and air quality outside. The data is then translated into sound that is streamed in both real-time on the Bike Sense website and broadcast over the Big Four Bridge speakers.

“Bike Sense encompasses our city’s core values of lifelong learning and health by incorporating science and exercise into public art,” said the Mayor. “This project will get people moving, either as volunteer cyclists collecting environmental data or as pedestrians crossing the Big Four Bridge to listen to the sounds created.”

The data will be publicly available and support the work of University of Louisville’s Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute.

“The Center for Healthy Air Water and Soil and the Superfund Research Center in the UofL Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute are partnering with the innovative Bike Sense project to raise awareness of the health risks posed by many volatile organic compounds,” said Dr. Ted Smith, Deputy Director of the Envirome Institute. “We look forward to providing technical assistance and health risk information to the project and its many cycling participants.”

The project was selected by the Commission on Public Art through a call for artists and is funded through a mix of private donations, public dollars, and an ArtsMatch grant from Fund for the Arts.

“By collecting volunteer cycling data that considers location as well as environmental factors, like temperature and air quality, we could learn a lot about where people are biking and how healthy it is to bike here. The sound part of the project was my creative way of sharing this data with the public,” said artist Todd C. Smith. “The bridge is a public space that sees thousands of pedestrians and cyclists and is the symbol of connection for the Kentuckiana region. I look forward to seeing how this year-long project progresses.”

For more information, visit BikeSense.net.

Canada geese in snow. Photos taken Feb. 9, 2006, at Kentucky Fish and Wildlife headquarters lake.

Applications will be accepted beginning Sept. 1  for two specially constructed waterfowl blinds for mobility-impaired hunters at Doug Travis Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Hickman and Carlisle counties. Applications for these quota hunts must be postmarked by Sept. 30.

“One blind, Blind 19, is a boat-in site with a handicap-accessible boat ramp. Hunters must hunt within 10 yards of the location marker while using this blind. There will not be a constructed blind to hide the boat this year,” said Wes Little, migratory bird biologist for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “The other blind, Blind 13, is an above ground blind that is wheelchair accessible. The mobility-impaired hunt party will be able to drive to this blind.”

The hunt dates for the mobility-impaired quota hunts during 2019-2020 are:

  • Nov. 28–Dec 1, 2019
  • Dec. 7-8, 2019
  • Dec. 9–12, 2019
  • Dec. 13–15, 2019
  • Dec. 16–19, 2019
  • Dec. 20–22, 2019
  • Dec. 23–26, 2019
  • Dec. 27–29, 2019
  • Dec. 30, 2019 – Jan. 2, 2020
  • Jan. 3–5, 2020
  • Jan. 6–9, 2020
  • Jan. 10–12, 2020
  • Jan. 13–16, 2020
  • Jan 17–19, 2020
  • Jan. 20–23, 2020
  • Jan. 24–26, 2020
  • Jan. 31, 2020

To register to be drawn for this blind during one or more of the mobility-impaired hunts, mail a 3 x 5 white index card in an envelope addressed to:

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources

Attn: Wes Little – Doug Travis WMA Mobility-Impaired Waterfowl Hunt Application

1 Sportsman’s Lane

Frankfort, KY 40601

The envelope must be postmarked between Sept. 1 and Sept. 30.

“Hunters must specify on the index card the dates for which they are applying and list them in order of preference,” Little said. “While they may apply for up to three hunting dates, they can only be drawn for one hunt. The index card must include the hunter’s name, complete mailing address and phone number as well.”

Successful applicants may invite up to three guests. After Sept. 30, those selected for hunts will be mailed a quota hunt permit for the dates they are drawn, a map showing the blind location and other instructions concerning the hunt. Unsuccessful applicants will not be notified. Duplicate applications for the same hunt will result in disqualification.

“The hunting party will be responsible for bringing and placing decoys as well as retrieving birds,” Little said. “These blinds are open to standby hunters on a first-come, first-served basis if the blind is not occupied by the drawn party by one hour before sunrise, but priority for its use will go to mobility impaired hunters.”

If not completed already, waterfowl hunters must go online at the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife website at fw.ky.gov and click the “My Profile” tab to fill out the Harvest Information Program (HIP) survey before hunting.

Dove Season Opens Soon

Photo: Kentucky Department Fish And Wildlife

Dove season opens on its traditional day of Sept. 1, and dove hunters need to know about some new rules regarding the use of public dove fields before hunting this year.

“New for this year, there is no access to public dove fields from Aug. 15 to Sept.1,” said Wes Little, migratory bird biologist for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “People can scout from the parking lot or road, but you cannot physically walk into the field.”

Little explained hunters repeatedly scouting fields before the season disturbs the doves and makes them more prone to stop using the field.

“The week prior to the season, we see many groups of hunters scouting the fields, and they unintentionally flush birds,” he said. “The more times you flush a dove, the less likely it is to come back to that field. We want to lessen some of that pressure before the season to ensure a quality hunt.”

There are two new public dove fields this year in Ballard and Butler counties. Hunters using the public dove fields at Curtis Gates Lloyd Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Grant County must know the shooting hours on opening day (Sept. 1) begin at 2 p.m.

Hunters using the cooperator dove field in Madison County off KY 627 must use U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved non-toxic shot.

Little noted that a few of the fields slated for public access failed due to the amount of rain this past spring.

A list of current dove fields is available by consulting the 2019-2020 Kentucky Hunting Guide for Dove, Early Waterfowl, Woodcock, Snipe and Crow. The guide, which is available online only, is accessible on Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s website. Go to fw.ky.gov and search under the keyword, “dove,” for rules, regulations and additional information.

Hunters can also use the interactive dove field map to find public dove fields on the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife website by searching under the keywords, “Public Dove Fields.”

Hunters using public fields should remember that they cannot clean their birds at the site. Hunters also must pick up all spent shotshell hulls or other trash and obey all signs.

The first segment of the 2019-2020 dove season opens Sept. 1 and closes Oct. 26. The second segment opens Nov. 28 and closes Dec. 8, while the third segment of dove season opens Dec. 21, 2019 and closes Jan. 12, 2020.

In addition to a valid Kentucky hunting license, dove hunters must possess a Kentucky Migratory Game Bird/Waterfowl Hunting Permit. Shotguns must be plugged to only hold three shells total, one in the chamber and two in the magazine.

If not completed already, dove hunters must go online at the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife website at fw.ky.gov and click the “My Profile” tab to fill out the Harvest Information Program (HIP) survey before hunting.

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