Thursday February 21, 2019
News Sections
Photo: Louisville Metro Council

Councilman Brandon Coan (D-8) is encouraging property and business owners along Bardstown Road, Baxter Avenue and the Douglass Loop to attend the next public meeting for the proposed creation of the Highlands Management District on Tuesday, February 12th at HopCat,1064 Bardstown Road beginning at 1:00pm.

“Since the first public meeting in 2018, we have been working to contact each and every property owner in the proposed service area to educate them about our plan,” said Coan. “This meeting is part of a homestretch effort to secure the commitments we need to move forward.”

The Councilman is proposing the creation of the Highlands Management District, a nongovernmental safety and cleanliness workforce, along the Bardstown Road/Baxter Avenue business corridor.

Management districts are funded by special assessments against properties located within service area boundaries, and they are managed by a voting board comprised of district property owners. The proposed Highlands Management District special assessment is $0.1745 per $100 PVA.

Coan’s proposal is the result of months of studies, reports and recommendations by an exploratory committee comprised of property owners and other stakeholders in the corridor, in consultation with the Louisville Downtown Partnership.

For more information about the proposed Highlands Management District, contact Councilman Coan’s office at 574-1108 or visit www.tinyurl.com/BardstownRdBID for more information.

Historic Locust Grove, a National Historic Landmark established c. 1792, is planning a year of programming centering on The Age of Hamilton, the period of time from c. 1770- 1805 that encompasses the American Revolution and the early years of American independence.

Keyed to the arrival in June 2019 of Hamilton: An American Musical, at the Kentucky Center for the Arts, Locust Grove will look at the personalities and events of the era of the American Revolution through the Early National period in depth. Washington, Jefferson, Burr, and Hamilton all were part of the world of William Croghan and George Rogers Clark.

The story of Locust Grove finds its roots in the American Revolution, through the military service of Major William Croghan, who established and lived at Locust Grove from 1792-1822, and his brother-in-law, General George Rogers Clark, who founded Louisville in 1778 and led the Illinois Campaign that brought the western territories under the control of American forces at the same time George Washington commanded the Continental Army in the east. Croghan fought with the Continental Army and was a participant in the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, and Germantown. He wintered with Continental forces at Valley Forge and witnessed the British surrender at Yorktown in 1781. Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, the Marquis de Lafayette were all part of the world of both Croghan and Clark.

“The experiences of the people of the Revolutionary era presented in Hamilton are mirrored in the stories of the people of Locust Grove and early Louisville,” says Carol Ely, Executive Director of Locust Grove.  “It’s exciting to have the chance to explore the personalities and ideas of the era in fresh new ways.”

Locust Grove kicks off The Age of Hamilton this month with A Winter’s Ball, just in time for Valentine’s Day. This historical ball will be held on Saturday, February 9 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm, and will feature live music and period dancing. Co-sponsored by The Jane Austen Society of North America—Greater Louisville Region, guests will be asked to wear historical dress from their favorite time period as we capture the atmosphere of the ball where Alexander Hamilton met his bride, Eliza Schuyler in 1780. 

Guests should look for a trio of Punch with the President evenings in March, April and May focusing on the lives and libations of presidents George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson.  Led by visiting historians, including Dr. Matthew Costello of The White House Historical Association, Gwynne Tuell Potts, and historical interpreter Peyton Dixon, these evening programs find connections between the first three presidents, early American history, and Locust Grove, along with period drinks. Locust Grove’s Afternoon Lecture Series, held on the first Wednesday of each month, will focus on revolutionary topics such as African Americans in the Revolution and dueling in Early Kentucky. A subsequent program on June 6, Hamilton: How the Musical Remixes American History, presented by Dr. Richard Bell, will explore the historical origins of the blockbuster musical.

This season of programming at Locust Grove also engages the site’s educational mission, with a professional development opportunity for teachers on February 16, and a student competition where students will perform using historical documents as their inspiration. Thanks to the generosity of the Louisville Theatrical Association/PNC Broadway in Louisville, participants in these programs will have the opportunity to win tickets to see Hamilton when it arrives in Louisville. Members of the public will also have the chance to win tickets for the show.

Finally, Locust Grove’s Age of Hamilton will culminate with The Hamilton Festival on June 16, 2019.  This celebration of the Revolution will feature student performances of original pieces, a re-creation of the Hamilton-Burr Duel, a sing-a-long, and presentation on clothing of the period, Aaron Burr’s time in Louisville, and more.

According to Brian Cushing, Locust Grove’s program director, “The site has explored a lot of exciting directions over the years but the contributions to the United States of America by the Revolutionary War veterans connected with Locust Grove, especially George Rogers Clark, remains the cornerstone of our story.  Now that Hamilton is shining a spotlight on that era, we’re able to draw our visitors, into the core of our mission of the exploration of history.”

A full calendar of The Age of Hamilton events and more information can be found at www.locustgrove.org/revolution.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) recently awarded a contract for rehabilitation of the Bernheim Bridge in Cherokee Park in Louisville. This bridge, also known as Bridge No. 8, crosses the Middle Fork of Beargrass Creek.

This project includes waterproofing and repairing the concrete arch, resetting the railings, masonry repairs on the spandrel walls and railings and new asphalt pavement on the crossing.

KYTC is coordinating the bridge repairs with Louisville Parks and Recreation and Olmsted Parks Conservancy.

Construction is scheduled to begin this week. The bridge crossing via Beargrass Road from Park Boundary Road and Alta Vista Road will be inaccessible through the duration of the project. The Bernheim Bridge will reopen to traffic in late summer.

Several popular nearby park features, including Big Rock pavilion, parking and playground area, will be easily accessible during the construction period. A detour map can be viewed below.

Louisville Paving Company was awarded the $1.1 million construction contract. Marr Construction will be the subcontractor for the masonry rehabilitation of the historic bridge. Marr has worked on several other bridge restoration projects in Cherokee Park.

The Bernheim Bridge dates to 1928 and was named for Bernhard and Rosa Bernheim, who were members of the notable Bernheim family that includes Isaac Wolfe Bernheim, who founded the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest south of Louisville.

Another bridge in Cherokee Park on the Scenic Loop is scheduled for repairs later this year. These bridges are part of KYTC’s Bridging Kentucky program. Bridging Kentucky includes more than 1,000 state, county, and municipal structures that are rated in poor condition or have restricted weight limits. More than 70 of the bridges on the list are currently closed to traffic.

Each bridge will be addressed in the next six years, either replaced with a new structure designed to last at least 75 years or rehabilitated to extend its life by at least 30 years. Those with restricted weight limits will reopen to school buses, emergency vehicles, commercial trucks, as well as passenger vehicles.

The date and duration of this work may be adjusted if inclement weather or other unforeseen delays occur. Visit goky.ky.gov for the latest in traffic and travel information in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Traffic information for the District 5 counties is also available at facebook.com/KYTCDistrict5 and twitter.com/KYTCDistrict5.

Prompted by concerns over temporary housing in residential areas, President David James (D-6) is calling for a review of the Land Development Code to see if additional standards need to be considered for approval.

Photo: Louisville Metro Council

          “There have been several instances where temporary housing has created issues dealing with nuisances and many are questioning the compatibility of some forms of this type of usage in residential areas and neighborhoods,” said James.

          The President announced the filing of the Resolution during a news conference on Monday where he was joined by the members of the Recovery Housing Task Force.

          “The Recovery Housing Task Force is a group of concerned citizens who meet with the Department of Public Health and Wellness. We took our concerns to President James. Transitional housing recovery housing boarding housing etc. has been a problem that has plagued our community for years,” Kimberly Moore of the Task Force. “We are here today because we want to address the problem. There have been numerous complaints from concerned citizens regarding issues within their community and there is ongoing predatory behavior.”

          The Resolution defines the many forms of temporary housing as: Transitional Housing, Boarding and Lodging Houses, Homeless Shelters, Rehabilitation Houses and Residential Care Facilities (collectively referred to as “Temporary Housing”).

          Several forms of temporary housing are allowed as conditional uses or as permitted use with special standards within certain designated zoning districts.

          The President said the Resolution asks Louisville Metro Planning and Design Services to review the Land Development Code regarding temporary housing in residential zoning districts to consider adoption of additional standards to improve the compatibility of these uses within residential areas. It asks for recommendations that will aid in the enforcement of the regulations to ensure compliance. 

          “I think this kind of review is long overdue considering the various types of temporary housing we have seen over the last several years,” says James. “I am seeking the support of my colleagues to move this forward.”     

          “We are not here today to put anyone out of business or displace individuals, but we are here to tell you that if you are not willing to treat people with respect, compassion and dignity we do NOT want you operating in Metro Louisville,” said Moore. “There will be actions taken if you are operating without proper permits. We are grateful that the County Attorney’s office have become willing to address this problem with us. We look forward to finding solutions to this problem.”

          The Resolution will be assigned to the Metro Council’s Planning and Zoning Committee.

Here is a link to the proposed Resolution:

https://louisvilleky.gov/sites/default/files/metro_council/members/6/pdf…

Councilwoman Donna Purvis reminds residents that the new District 5 satellite office will officially open tomorrow, Tuesday February 5th.

Photo: Louisville Metro Council

 “I am looking forward to hearing from the people of District 5 with any issues or concerns they may have with Metro Government,” says the Councilwoman.

The District 5 Satellite Office is located in the Kroger at 520 North 35th Street. Hours will be from 9:00am to 12:00pm on the 5th and 19th of each month. Councilwoman Purvis will be there personally to address concerns and meet constituents.

“This is a very informal setting and anyone who feels they need to talk with me on anything should stop by or just come by to say hello. It is important that I know what’s on your mind,” says Purvis.

For more information, Contact Councilwoman Purvis’ Office at 574-1105.

Free Radon Test Kits

The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness is offering free radon test kits while the supply lasts. You can request a kit by visitng this link or by calling 574-6650.

Radon is a gas that you cannot smell, taste or see. It forms naturally when uranium, radium and thorium break down in rocks, soil and groundwater. People can be exposed to radon primarily from breathing radon in air that comes in through cracks and gaps in homes and other buildings. Radon can cause lung cancer through prolonged exposure. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, behind smoking, and the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, causing between 15,000 and 22,000 lung cancer deaths each year.

The entire state of Kentucky is at high risk for radon exposure with about 40 percent of homes estimated to have unsafe levels. The only way to know if radon exists at dangerous levels in your home is to test for it.

“People can’t see or smell radon so they may not know that it can exist at dangerous levels in their homes and be exposing them to deadly health effects,” said Dr. Sarah Moyer, director of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness and the city’s chief health strategist. “We encourage people to take advantage of the free test kits to test their homes for radon.”

The lung cancer risk factors of tobacco smoke and radon are related. More radon-related lung cancers occur in individuals with a history of exposure to tobacco smoke. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, with the highest mortality rate of any cancer. Kentucky has the highest incidence rate of lung cancer in the nation with a rate of 93.4 per 100,000 compared to the national average of 59.4.   According to the recently released 2017 Health Equity Report, cancer is the leading cause of death in Louisville.

The death rate from lung cancer in Kentucky is 69.5 per 100,000 compared to the national average of 43.4.  In Louisville our lung cancer incidence and mortality rates are also well above the national average.  According to the Kentucky Cancer Registry the incidence rate of lung cancer in Louisville is 94.8 per 100,000 compared to 59.4 nationally.  The death rate is 61.7 compared to 43.4 nationally.

Here are a few tips to help prevent radon in your home:

  • Stop smoking and discourage smoking in your home.
  • Smoking significantly increases the risk of lung cancer from radon.
  • Second hand smoking in the home is also a leading cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
  • Increase air flow in your house by opening windows and using fans and vents to circulate air.
  • Seal cracks in floors and walls with plaster, caulk, or other mate­rials designed for this purpose.
  • Seek a qualified contractor to help remove the radon from your home.

Mitigation costs generally range from $1,200 to $2,500 depending on the size and foundation of the home.  Consult the Kentucky Association of Radon Professionals or the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists National Radon Proficiency Program to locate approved contractors near you.

Reports Of Flu Cases Rises

719 new cases of flu were reported last week (Jan. 27 – Feb 2). That’s a new high for this flu season.  The predominant strain continues to be type A which is covered in this year’s flu vaccine.  You can see more more detail on flu in Louisville by viewing our weekly influenza data briefs found HERE.

Learn more about the flu, the flu vaccine, what to do if you have the flu, and how to prevent the flue HERE.

Archives